Este es un foro dedicado a las Fuerzas Armadas Mexicanas así como de los diferentes Cuerpos de Policía y demás entes que se dedican a la Seguridad interna de México.


Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

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tapping.the.vein
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Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por tapping.the.vein el 12/7/2011, 5:06 pm



This poster seems to be dated 1924, a period during which the Nazi Party was banned after the 1923 Beer Hall Putsch. The caption is:

“Germany’s Liberation.”

It likely came from one of the substitute parties Nazis founded to continue the movement while the Nazi Party was illegal. Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks






I think this dates to 1927, when Hitler was prohibited from speaking in most of Germany. The text translates:

“Who is Adolf Hitler? The man from the people, for the people! The German front soldier who risked his life in 48 battles for Germany! What does Adolf Hitler want? Freedom and food for every decent working German! The gallows for profiteers, black marketeers and exploiters, regardless of religious faith or race! Why is Adolf Hitler not allowed to speak? Because he is ruthless in uncovering the rulers of the German economy, the international bank Jews and their lackeys, the Democrats, Marxists, Jesuits, and Free Masons! Because he wants to free the workers from the domination of big money! Working Germans! Demand the lifting of the illegal ban on his speaking!

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






The Nazis viewed this as one of their best posters. It, too, is by Mjölnir. The caption translates:

“National Socialism: The Organized Will of the Nation.”

Goebbels claimed that Mjölnir perfected the art of drawing the Nazi Storm Trooper.






For a period in the 1920’s, Hitler was forbidden to address public meetings in much of Germany, which was a major blow to the Nazi propaganda apparatus. This poster, by cartoonist Philipp Rupprecht (most known for his cartoons for Julius Streicher’s Der Stürmer) is captioned:

"He alone of two billion people on earth may not speak in Germany.”


Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






I’m not sure of the date of this Mjölnir poster. It’s for a provincial election in Saxony. Since the Nazis are List 7, it must be 1930 or earlier. The caption:
“Free Saxony from Marxist trash!”






This is a poster for the April 1929 provincial election in Saxony. The Dawes Plan was an international agreement dealing with the matter of German reparations payments from World War I. The caption reads:

“Break the Dawes Chains.”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






Another election poster from 1929 Saxon campaign. The caption reads:

“Two million dead. Did they die in vain? Never! Front soldiers! Adolf Hitler is showing you the way!” The claim is that Hitler will redeem Germany from the loss of World War I."

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This poster is from the September 1930 Reichstag election, in which the Nazis made their electoral breakthrough. The caption:
“The people rise! They vote List 9.”
Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






Another poster on the same theme from September 1930. The text translates as:
“Despite the ban, not dead. The German who loves freedom belongs in the National Socialist S.A."






This vivid poster from the September 1930 Reichstag election summarizes Nazi ideology in a single image. A Nazi sword kills a snake, the blade passing through a red Star of David. The red words coming from the snake are:

"Usury, Versailles, unemployment, war guilt lie, Marxism, Bolshevism, lies and betrayal, inflation, Locarno, Dawes Pact, Young Plan, corruption, Barmat, Kutistker, Sklarek [the last three Jews involved in major financial scandals], prostitution, terror, civil war."

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This 1930 poster was produced for local groups to use in advertising their meetings. The poster reads:

“Come to the NSDAP Meeting.”


There is room to fill in the date, time and speaker. At the bottom, there are the following notes:

Admission Price:
War injured and the unemployed half price
Jews not admitted

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






I am not sure of the date of this poster, but I’d guess 1930. The text reads:

"The Red War. Mother or Comrade? Man or Machine? God or the Devil? Blood or God? Race or Bastard? Popular music or jazz? National Socialism or Bolshevism?"

Courtesy of Robert D. Brooks.






I am not sure of the exact date of this poster, which comes from the 1930-1932 period. The caption is:

“Death to Lies.”

A strong Nazi fist grips a snake with “Marxism” and “High Finance” on it.
Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This is a 1931 poster on a referendum to dissolve the Prussian parliament. The caption reads:

“Come out for the Referendum on 9 August.”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






A January 1932 poster, announcing 16 simultaneous mass meetings in Berlin on the theme of unemployment. The text:

“5,600,000 unemployed demand work! The need of the unemployed is the need of the whole people! On Friday evening, 15 January 1932, at 8 p.m., there will be sixteen mass meetings for the unemployed.” The meeting places are listed, with a note that admission for the employed is 20 pfenning, 10 pfennng for the unemployed"

Courtesy of the University of Minnesota Library.






I think this is also from 1932. It too deals with Hitler’s citizenship. The caption:

“A front soldier earns his German citizenship. All German front soldiers who, like Adolf Hitler, earned and proved their citizenship through blood and the risk of their lives, read the ‘Völkischer Beobachter,’ the newspaper of their comrade Adolf Hitler. Fight for the truth! Death to the lie! Each German man and woman will vote for Adolf Hitler!”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This poster comes from the 1932 presidential elections, but I am not sure which round. The caption on top, in pseudo-Hebraic lettering, translates as:

“We are voting for Hindenburg!”


The pictures are of a variety of Jewish socialists and communists, sex researchers, etc. The caption beneath:

“Look at these faces and you’ll know where you belong!”

The pictures are of leading Nazis. Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This poster comes from the April 1932 German presidential election, a run-off between Hitler and Hindenburg. The top reads:

"One man against the party cadavers and special interests!”


To the left is a picture of a huge Hitler head towering over the 11 million who voted for him in the first round of the election in March 1932. To the left are the various parties that together made up Hindenburg’s supporters. At the bottom the caption reads: “Give your vote to the man of strength — Hitler.”

The author of the standard Nazi book on posters did not like this one. He writes:

“Hitler’s head looks like a soft-focused picture of an American film actor. This picture destroys the effect. ‘A man of strength’ must look like the Führer in the poster ‘We are taking the fate of the nation in our hands.’ [See below] ... as our Führer really appears. The only explanation for this picture is that it was aimed at women. Women, who make up a major part of the electorate, as is well known, are more influenced by superficialities.”







A poster for the July 1932 Reichstag election. The caption says:

“The workers have awakened!”

Various other parties are trying to persuade the worker to side with them, without success. The small chap in the center with the red hat represents the Marxists (note the Jew whispering in his ear). His piece of paper says:

“Nazi barons! Emergency decrees. Lies and slanders. The big-wigs are living high on the hog, the people are wretched.”

During the Weimar Republic, a party’s position on the ballot depended on its strength. The higher the position on the list, the better the party had done in previous elections.






From the July 1932 Reichstag election.
The poster shows a Nazi pile driver hitting the party’s opponents.
The gentlemen in black represents the Catholic Center Party, the one to the right the Marxist parties.
The poster suggests the two are tied together in an unholy alliance against National Socialism.
Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






From the July 1932 Reichstag election. The text translates as:

“Over 300 National Socialists died for you — murdered by Marxist subhumanity!!! For work and food vote Adolf Hitler List 2.”

The reference is to Nazis killed during the political battles on the streets and in political meetings. The Christian imagery is clear.
Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This poster comes from the November 1932 Reichstag election. The text:

“The people vote for List 1: The National Socialists.”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks






“Work and Food,”

this poster says. It was used for the November 1932 Reichstag election. The Nazis viewed this as one of their most effective posters.






The caption of this poster for November 1932 reads:

“We are building the new Germany. Think on their sacrifice. Vote National Socialist.”

The poster emphasizes that many of Hitler’s followers were injured or killed in political battles. Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






132 Nazi Election Poster
Yet another November 1932 poster. The caption:

“Work and food through National Socialism.”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This vivid poster is from the November 1932 election. The text:
“‘Bravo, Herr von Papen! Keep up those emergency decrees, and the pension and pay cuts. That will give us communists our last chance.’ Is that to be what happens? No! Only one man can rescue us from Bolshevism: Adolf Hitler!”


Courtesy of the University of Minnesota Library.





Another March 1933 poster. The text:

“In the deepest need Hindenburg chose Adolf Hitler for Reich Chancellor. You too should vote for List 1.”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This poster is for the 5 March 1933 Reichstag election. The top text:

“Bill for the Social Democratic Party (SPD), presented by the starving German people.” It lists the alleged sins of the Socialists, and concludes: “German people! That is fourteen years of serfdom. Never forget it! Now you must demand payment. You will receive that payment if you vote for Adolf Hitler.”

Courtesy of the University of Minnesota Library.





S. A. Mann
Another poster glorifying the S.A. I can’t date this one, though it looks to be from the early years of the Nazi regime.






I am not certain of the date of this astonishing poster, although I am quite sure it is from the 1930’s. This poster makes the most direct Christological comparison I’ve seen. Just as a dove descended on Christ when he was baptised by John the Baptist, so what looks to be an eagle hovers against the light of heaven over an idealized Hitler. The text:

“Long live Germany!.”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






A 1933 poster announcing an agricultural fair. It’s eight months after Hitler took power, and the Swastika is showing up everywhere. This poster is provided by J. Castillon.






This poster links the German Labor Front (the DAF) to World War I. The point is that just as soldiers were comrades regardless of their standing in civil life, so too all German workers were comrades in the DAF, regardless of whether they were white or blue collar. This appeared in 1933..






This visual from the mid-1930’s shows Germany in white, with the 100,000-man army permitted by the Treaty of Versailles, surrounded by heavily armed neighbors.






WHW Poster

The Winter Aid (Winterhilfswerk) was the Nazi Party charity. Each year there was a drive to solicit donations to help the needy. Contributions were not entirely “voluntary.” The text translates as:

“No one shall go hungry! No one shall be cold!”

Photo courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






Nazi Charity Poster

This poster advertises the Nazi charity, the NSV. The text translates:

“Health, child protection, fighting poverty, aiding travellers, community, helping mothers: These are the tasks of the National Socialist People’s Charity. Become a member!”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






WHW Poster
This poster encouraged sacrificial contributions to the Winter Aid. The text translates:

“don’t give. Sacrifice.”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This poster promotes Hitler’s 1936 referendum. Since it quotes Schwabian Gauleiter Karl Wahl, I assume it comes from his area. Hitler is quoted as saying:

“I ask the German people to strengthen my faith and to lend me its strength so that I will always and everywhere have the strength to fight for its honor and freedom, to work for its economic prosperity, and particularly to strenthen me in my struggles for genuine peace.”


Karl Wahl says:

“German women and men, it is in your own interest to fulfill the Führer’s request and vote on 29 March 1936. Be loyal to him who is loyal!”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






1936 Poster

This poster is from the 1936 referendum. The text:

“The train would have to be 6,000 kilometers long, stretching from Berlin to Addis Ababa, if it had to carry the 209 million hundredweights of materials contributed to the Winter Relief drive during the years 1933-1935. That is socialism in action. Support the Führer on 29 March!”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This poster is from the 1936 referendum. The text says that German industrial production has risen from 34.8 billion marks in 1932 to 58.3 billion in 1935.

“An unprecedented increase in industrial production is the result of the Führer’s economic policy. Keep it going! Vote for the Führer on 29.3!”

Courtesy of the University of Minnesota Library.






This poster is probably from the 1936 referendum. The text:

“Before: Unemployment, hopelessness, desolation, strikes, lockouts.

Today: Work, joy, discipline, comaradarie. Give the Führer your vote!”


Courtesy of the University of Minnesota Library.






This poster probably comes from the mid-1930’s. The caption:

“Hitler is building. Help him. Buy German goods.”






This poster by Mjölnir (Hans Schweitzer) uses one of his favorite themes. An S.A. man stands next to a soldier. I am not sure of the date. The text:

“The guarantee of German military strength!”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






Trade Poster

This poster is from the 1930’s, and encourages Germans to buy domestic rather than imported goods. The top translates as

“Germans buy German goods.” The bottom text translates: “German Week/German Goods/German Labor.”






I’m not sure of the date on this poster, but it’s probably from the mid to late 1930’s. It promotes the Nazi labor service, for which men were expected to volunteer. The caption:
“We build body and soul.”






Women’s Arbeitsdienst Poster

This poster is from the 1930’s encourages women to sign up for the labor service. The caption:

“A wonderful task: Reich Labor Service Women’s Leader: A job for today!”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This poster probably dates to the mid-1930’s. It promotes the Nazi charitable organization (the NSV). The text:
“Support the assistance program for mothers and children.”






This poster promoted education. The caption:

“Adolf Hitler’s youth attends community schools.”

I’m not sure of the date, but probably the mid-1930’s. Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This 1936 poster urges people to vote for Hitler by noting what he has done to promote automobile ownership in Germany. The caption:

“The Führer promised to motorize Germany. In 1932, 104,000 motor vehicles were manufactured, 33,000 people were employed, and goods with a total value of 295,000,000 marks were produced. In 1935, 353,000 vehicles were manufactured, Over 100,000 people were employed, and the value of goods produced was 1,150,000,000 marks. The Führer gave 250,000 people’s comrades jobs in the auto industry and its suppliers. German people: Thank the Führer on 29 March! Give him your vote!”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






The Nazis staged an anti-Bolshevism exhibition in 1937. The program for the event is also available. I take this image from Wikipedia, which credits it to the Library of Congress.






Nazi poster

This poster is from the 1938. The caption:

“Germany is free!”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






The Reich Colonial League was a Nazi Party affiliate propagandizing for the return of Germany’s former African colonies. the caption translates as:

“The Reich Colonial League Calls to You Too!”

The poster probably dates to the 1930’s.






Volkswagen Poster

This poster from around 1939 advertises the Volkswagen. The text:

“Save 5 marks a week and you will drive your own car."

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This is a another poster used to advertise local Nazi meetings. There is space to fill in the time, location, speaker and topic. I’m not sure of the date.





Nazi war veterans' poster

This poster promotes the NSKOV, the Nazi organization for veterans. The caption:

“Comrades at the front — Comrades for life. Advice and assistance in all areas of need.”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This poster is from the 1930’s, and promotes the Nazi monthly Neues Volk (New People}, the organ of the party’s racial office. The text reads:

“This genetically ill person will cost our people’s community 60,000 marks over his lifetime. Citizens, that is your money. Read Neues Volk, the monthly of the racial policy office of the NSDAP.”






This poster was released in summer 1940. German morale reports found that it was effective. The text translates as:

“Smash the Enemies of Greater Germany!”


A literal translation would be:

”Into Dust with All Enemies of Greater Germany.”


This is a reference to Heinrich von Kleist’s The Prince of Homburg. In that play, a desperate Brandenburg, progenitor of Prussia, is saved from overwhelming threat from invading Swedes by the virtue of its campaigners, as well as its ruler. The final line of the play:

“Into the dust with all enemies of Brandenburg.”

This information was provided by Andreas Ehlers of Hamburg.

The poster is courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This 1940 poster advertises the worst of the Nazi anti-Semitic films,

“The Eternal Jew.”

For additional information on the film, see a comprehensive web site by Stig Hornshøj-Møller.






The caption:
“The Jew: The inciter of war, the prolonger of war.”

This poster was released in late 1943 or early 1944. The artist was Hans Schweitzer (“Mjölnir”).

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






SS recruiting poster

This is an SS recruiting poster. I’m not sure of the date. It says one can join at 18, and sign up for shorter or longer periods of service. It gives the address of the recruiting office in Munich.
Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This poster advertises a county rally of the Nazi Party from 1941 (a miniature version of the Nuremberg rally). A woman plows the field while her husband fights on the front.






The caption of this 1940 poster translates:

“Victory is with our Flags.”

650,000 copies were distributed.





This poster is 1942 or after, since one soldier is wearing a decoration first issued in 1942. The text translates as: “Infantry: The Queen of the Services.”






This is another WWII production poster from the winter of 1940-1941.. The text translates as: “You are the front!” Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






Nazi War Poster

This poster is probably from 1941. It’s a rather interesting one. The top translates as “Germany Must Die!” It exploits a 1941 book published in the U.S. by Theodore N. Kaufman titled Germany Must Perish, which advocated, among other things, the sterilization of the entire German population and the dismemberment of Germany as a nation. The map shown in the poster is in fact Kaufman’s proposal to distribute German territory to its neighbors. Although Kaufman was insignificant (he published his book himself), the Nazis presented it as official Allied policy, and claimed Kaufman was an influential advisor to Roosevelt.
More info: http://www.h-ref.de/feindbilder/juedische-kriegserklaerungen/germany-must-perish.php






This poster was issued around May 1942. The text translates as: “Work as hard for victory as we fight!”






Nazi War Poster

A Mjölnir poster is also from around May 1942. The caption: “One battle, one will, one goal: Victory at any cost!” The poster is by “Mjölnir,” Goebbels’ artist from Berlin, whose real name was Hans Schweitzer (1901-1980), and the theme is a takeoff on one of his pre-1933 posters. Hans Schweitzer survived the war and had a successful career as a graphic artist after 1945, though I doubt he used his pen name... Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This poster is from late 1942. The text at the bottom: The New Europe cannot be defeated.” The rest of the text explains that the plans of British plutocrats and their American allies, as well as the Jews behind them, have failed.






30 January 1943 was the 10th anniversary of the Nazi seizure of power. This poster suggests that the 1943 battle against the world is the continuation of the battle that led to Nazi victory in 1933. The caption:

“30 January 1933-1943. One Battle! One Victory!”

The theme is a takeoff on one of Mjölnir’s pre-1933 posters. This poster was withdawn after Stalingrad.






This Mjölnir poster appeared in February 1943, just after the defeat at Stalingrad. It was part of a major propaganda campaign with the theme

“Victory or Bolshevist Chaos.”


The party’s propagandists were told to make sure the poster was posted by itself rather than next to other posters. The text translates as:

“Victory or Bolshevism.”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This poster was issued during the summer of 1943. The text translates as: “Build Weapons for the Front.” Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This looks to be a late-war recruiting poster for the SS, a time at which the Nazis were recruiting younger and younger soldiers. The caption doesn’t translate directly, but means:

“Enlist now!”


A literal translation would be:

“Especially you!”






Nazi War Production Poster

This poster comes from the World War II period. The text translates as:

[i]“Labor Comrade. You work with us. Keep up your strength!”


Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






Nazi Production Poster

The text reads:

“Unshakable, determined to fight, certain of victory!”






Before World War II began, Germans were allowed to listen to foreign radio broadcasts. This was banned once the war began, and by the end of the war people were executed for listing to enemy radio stations. In this poster, a Marxist looking chap broadcasts from London, Moscow, and other enemy states, while a German listens in the darkness, trying to conceal his crime.






Volksturm Poster

This fall 1944 poster is by Mjölnir. The Volksturm was the Nazi attempt to call on the last reserves. Those too young or too old for regular military service were called into service. The caption translates as

“For freedom and life.”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






This poster, in Ukrainian, translates as:

“Stand up to fight Bolshevism in the ranks of the Galicia division.”

This is a recruiting poster for an SS division of Ukrainian nationals. Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






Finally, several Nazi posters aimed at foreign audiences. This one (in Slovak) recalls the Russian massacre of Polish officers in Katyn Forest. Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






Katyn Poster

This one is intended for Flemish speaking Belgians, urging them to join the SS Langemarck Division. The caption in red says:

“Our anwer: Pick up your arms and fight!”

The soldiers are attacking England, personsified by a Jew with the Union Jack.






Norwegian SS recruiting poster

An SS recruiting poster used in Norway. The translation (provided by Eirik Solberg):

“Come with us north”
at the top, and

“The Norwegian Skihunter Batallion”
at the bottom.

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.






Dutch SS recruiting poster

An SS recruiting poster used in the Netherlands:

“For your honor and conscience! Against Bolshevism. The Waffen-SS calls you!”

Courtesy of Dr. Robert D. Brooks.

http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/posters1.htm
http://www.calvin.edu/academic/cas/gpa/posters2.htm



Supongo que ya se pueden ver todas la imagenes. Tal vez no todas porque son bastantes al cargar la página.


Última edición por tapping.the.vein el 20/5/2012, 1:01 am, editado 9 veces
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Re: Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por Perseo el 12/7/2011, 5:14 pm

no s eve ninguna de sus imagenes :S
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Re: Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por ramirez542 el 12/7/2011, 6:32 pm

A darle click derecho y abrir en una nueva pestaña compañero xD. Gracias por haberse tomado el tiempo de postear esto compañero. No se mucho ingles pero gracias.
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tapping.the.vein
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Re: Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por tapping.the.vein el 12/7/2011, 6:35 pm

Yo veo las imágenes completas sin necesidad de abrir links externos!




Y traté de traducir los textos, pero.... pero confío en sus habilidades para el inglés. Saludos


Última edición por tapping.the.vein el 13/7/2011, 3:28 am, editado 2 veces
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Re: Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por Sun Tzu el 12/7/2011, 7:08 pm

yo tampoco las veo Sad


___________________________________
Por Mèxico siempre leales.


Si luchas con monstruos, cuida de no convertirte también en monstruo." />
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Re: Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por asterix el 13/7/2011, 12:15 am






Ohhh..Mein Fuehrer....cuanto NOS HACE FALTA TU EJEMPLO..en estos días de tribulación....


Un saludo.


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Re: Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por Stardust-Knight el 13/7/2011, 12:49 am

Pues estuve checando y haciendo pruebas, pero al parecer el problema es que el servidor donde están alojadas estas imágenes no permite su visualización o eso me parece. A mi las dos primeras imágenes si me salen porque están alojadas en imageshack, pero las demás están en el mismo servidor (www.calvin.edu) por lo cual no se ven. Probé subiendo una de las imágenes a otro servidor y se visualizó correctamente. Y no es el navegador porque en todos da el mismo problema, pero lo que no se es como si las puede ver el compañero tapping.the.vein. Pues la única solución seria subir todas las imágenes al mismo servidor, pero por la cantidad de estas seria muy tardado. Pero haber quien encuentra otra forma. Jajajaja, pero bueno lo importante, muy buena info pero me da mas flojera leer porque está en ingles xD.
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Re: Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por Enemigo Público el 13/7/2011, 2:12 am

Hitler pudo ser un hijo de su rechingada madre, pero tuvo el temple para reencausar a su pais y levantarlo de la ruina para una vez mas catapultarlo a la grandeza.

Hombres con esa desición necesitamos en México, ¿alguna idea de porque no se ha empezado una campaña al estilo nazi en México?, lo digo porque sería una forma de impulsar un nacionalismo civico apegado a las leyes y normas de convivencia social, para tratar de acabar con la cultura del vale-madres, narcocultura y afines.
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Re: Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por Shirok el 13/7/2011, 10:55 am

Ahora si ya las veo, muchas gracias compañero, es curioso que las tematicas de muchos poster se pueden seguir aplicando en el presente...

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Re: Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por Lanceros de Toluca el 14/7/2011, 5:55 pm

Nombre enemigo, si nada mas ver como le tiran en el Facebook al Ejercito (y pocos o nadie se avientan al ruedo para defenderlos)

Y ya quieres una campaña bien 'Goebbels'iana... se empieza desde lo mas bajo, desde la gente comun que este dispuesta a mover ala opinion publica, para llegar a esos niveles
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Re: Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por tapping.the.vein el 17/7/2015, 11:13 pm

Pueden enviarme mensaje si desean alguna de las imágenes que han sido baneadas.
Saludos
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Re: Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por creative1n el 18/7/2015, 4:11 pm

Heil, mein Führer

Enemigo publico ni lo piense que en Mexico pueda salir un lider como ese, sera mas facil seguir el camino en el que vamos, y en unas 6-8 candidaturas mas nuestros postergados a presidencia tendran que viajar y recivir el "OK' de Israel para postergarse a presidente eso ni lo DUDE !!!
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Re: Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por sasori el 18/7/2015, 4:59 pm

No necesitamos ejemplos extranjeros para liderasgo. Ejemplos de lideres como Lazaro Cardenas y pancho villa son mas chinjones que hitler.

Pero si se necesita lideres que acen por la nacion y la gente. I don't think we will ever bow to Israel. Des de que nos Han vendido chatara voladora hojala no se hagan tantos tratos asi.

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Re: Propaganda durante la Alemania Nazi (En Inglés)

Mensaje por Contenido patrocinado


    Fecha y hora actual: 18/10/2017, 5:08 pm