Este es un foro dedicado a las Fuerzas Armadas Mexicanas así como de los diferentes Cuerpos de Policía y demás entes que se dedican a la Seguridad interna de México.


Los nuevos porta helicópteros de la RAN con problemas en los motores.

Comparte
avatar
Major_Tom
Teniente
Teniente

Mensajes : 995
Masculino
Edad : 20

Los nuevos porta helicópteros de la RAN con problemas en los motores.

Mensaje por Major_Tom el 4/6/2017, 6:27 pm

En los dos nuevos buques LHD de la Armada de Australia, se han encontrado fallas en los sistemas de propulsión, que podrían costar mucho dinero y tendrían a los dos buques fuera de servicio al menos hasta octubre.

Navy's largest ships unable to join Cyclone Debbie emergency response amid engine troubles
Exclusive by defence reporter Andrew Greene

Updated 28 Mar 2017, 2:26am
HMAS Adelaide
Photo: HMAS Adelaide is currently docked at Sydney's Garden Island Naval base. (File Photo: CPL Kyle Genner)
Related Story: Cyclone Debbie's eye reaches mainland, wall collapses on man
Map: Garden Island 2011

Engineers are frantically working to solve engine problems on the Royal Australian Navy's two largest ships, with fears the Landing Helicopter Docks (LHDs) could be out of action for several weeks.

The Canberra Class Amphibious Assault Ships HMAS Canberra and HMAS Adelaide are currently docked at Sydney's Garden Island Naval Base where maintenance crews are trying to identify and resolve issues with the LHDs' azimuth propulsion system.

Defence sources have confirmed to the ABC they currently expect the problem will take between seven and 10 days to address, but if further complications are found, the 27,000-tonne ships could remain sidelined for even longer.

The Defence Force insists the inspections have "had no impact on Navy meeting its operational tasks".

In a statement to the ABC on Monday night the Defence Department confirmed a propulsion issue had been identified on board HMAS Canberra during recent trials with military helicopters.

"As a prudent measure, the same inspections were conducted on HMAS Adelaide and identified emergent issues," it said in a statement.

"It is too early to determine the extent of this emergent work and Defence is working to identify the causes and develop a repair strategy."
Unavailable ships a 'significant failure': Feeney

Federal Opposition MP David Feeney, who sits on Parliament's Joint Standing Committee for Defence, Foreign Affairs and Trade, said it was a worrying development.

"The news that both of our major amphibious ships are unavailable for service in this Queensland cyclone period is very, very troubling and represents a significant failure," Mr Feeney said.

"The good news is that the capability gap can be filled by HMAS Choules, a vessel procured by the former Labor government in 2010, but nonetheless these amphibious ships are designed for precisely this work that they're now not able to do."

Media player: "Space" to play, "M" to mute, "left" and "right" to seek.
Audio: Listen to Andrew Greene's story on AM (AM)

Mr Feeney demanded the Government provide a full explanation of the problems.

"The Government does need to explain to us precisely what is the engineering problem that they're confronting, how did it happen, and I think, very importantly, will these ships be available for service in Operation Talisman Sabre [in July]."

On Monday, the Chief of Defence, Air Chief Marshal Mark Binskin, said the military was well positioned to provide immediate assistance to local communities within Cyclone Debbie's storm zone, if requested.

"We are ready and able to respond to this emergency in support of civilian emergency authorities and the residents of north-eastern Queensland once the full impact of [Cyclone] Debbie is known," he said.

As a precaution, HMAS Choules — the nominated HADR (Humanitarian Assistance and Disaster Relief) ship — left Sydney on Monday morning to head to Queensland "to be ready to support recovery efforts if required".

http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-03-28/largest-ships-unable-to-join-cyclone-debbie-emergency-response/8391574

avatar
Major_Tom
Teniente
Teniente

Mensajes : 995
Masculino
Edad : 20

Re: Los nuevos porta helicópteros de la RAN con problemas en los motores.

Mensaje por Major_Tom el 4/6/2017, 6:37 pm

LHDs remain alongside as Defence grapples with propulsion issues

April 26, 2017 by australianaviation.com.au
File image of HMAS Adelaide approaching Fleet Base East (Garden Island) with HMAS Canberra in the background. (Defence)

The Navy’s two amphibious assault ships HMAS Canberra and HMAS Adelaide remain tied alongside at Fleet Base East, Sydney while Defence investigates issues with the LHDs’ azimuth propulsion systems.

The issue first came to public attention almost a month ago on March 29 when ABC defence reporter Andrew Green reported that both vessels were out of service after propulsion issues were discovered with HMAS Canberra while it was undertaking first of class flight trials with Army and Navy helicopters off the coast of Queensland in March.

“During these activities, a propulsion issue was identified aboard HMAS Canberra and she is currently alongside in Sydney being inspected,” Chief of Navy Vice Admiral Tim Barrett wrote on the Defence website on March 28.

“As a prudent measure, the same inspections were conducted on HMAS Adelaide and identified emergent issues.

“Having identified these emergent issues the ADF has put in place a very deliberate plan to investigate the issue and resolve it.”

However, the issues with the azimuth propulsion systems remain unresolved, with an April 25 news story in the Daily Telegraph by Matthew Benns reporting that “an investigation found maintenance and oil changes were not being done properly”.

This assertion was disputed by Deputy Chief of Navy Rear Admiral Michael Noonan, who wrote a clarifying “On the Record” statement subsequently posted on the Navy Daily website.

“Defence has maintained and operated HMA Ships Canberra and Adelaide in accordance with the builder’s specifications, including the oils and lubricants used in their operation,” RADM Noonan, who is Acting Chief of Navy, wrote.

“Defence’s leadership is not “baffled” by these emergent issues, but it is still too early to determine the full extent of this emergent work. Defence has, and continues to work closely with industry and the original equipment manufacturers, Navantia, Siemens and BAE, to identify the root cause of the issues and develop the most appropriate repair strategy.”

HMAS Canberra was commissioned in November 2014 with HMAS Adelaide following in December 2015, but both ships are yet to be declared fully operational.

“Defence has taken prudent measures to ensure the operational test and evaluation period of the vessels is sufficiently thorough to ensure they will serve the nation for decades to come,” wrote RADM Noonan.

He continued that “it remains too early to determine the extent of this emergent work and Defence is working to identify the causes and develop a repair strategy.”

The 27,500 tonnes displacement LHDs are powered by two 11-megawatt Siemens azimuth propulsion system thrusters with dual propellers mounted on 360-degree steerable pods driven by onboard electric motors – electricity for which is generated by the ships’ combined diesel and gas powerplant system. The LHDs’ azimuth propulsion systems and plus their twin bow thrusters – similar configurations are fitted to large cruise ships – greatly improve ship manoeuvrability compared to conventional fixed-screw arrangements.
Cutaway image of the Canberra class LHD showing on the ships’ two azimuth propulsion systems.


http://australianaviation.com.au/2017/04/lhds-remain-alongside-as-defence-grapples-with-propulsion-issu

    Fecha y hora actual: 22/9/2017, 2:01 pm