Este es un foro dedicado a las Fuerzas Armadas Mexicanas así como de los diferentes Cuerpos de Policía y demás entes que se dedican a la Seguridad interna de México.


Bases Chinas internacionales - Navales, aereas y combinadas - ubicaciones, infraestructura, notas e imagenes

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Bases Chinas internacionales - Navales, aereas y combinadas - ubicaciones, infraestructura, notas e imagenes

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 6/2/2016, 5:02 pm

En movimientos estrategicos,  China muestra la geopolitica con este movimiento
de establecer una Base Naval en Djibouti(Bab-al-mandeb) con propositos de
abastecimientos (propios y de proveeduria a las necesidades locales), en una
ubicacion clave frente a la terminacion del Mar Rojo y el Golfo de Aden.
 No termina el acuerdo, sino inicia una postura de ubicarse en los puntos
claves de transito maritimo, y por la habilidad de reabastecerse en zonas
aun por revelarse.
 La presencia China en el continente Africano, crea la puerta para el intercambio
de ida y venida de recursos y bienes generados en su plataforma continental.







China's First Overseas Base in Djibouti Will 'Help Fleet'
© AP Photo/ Sayyid Azim
Asia & Pacific
20:29 06.02.2016(updated 20:40 06.02.2016) Get short URL



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China's first overseas naval logistics support outpost is estimated to be built in Djibouti and it is reported that it would be used to take care of problems faced by China’s peacekeeping fleet, the Foreign Ministry told China Daily on Thursday.

Djibouti's President Ismail Omar Guelleh was quoted by Reuters as saying that China was expected to start work on the facility soon.

Recently, China and Djibouti have “reached consensus” regarding the construction of logistical facilities in the African state and the much anticipated deal has finally been confirmed.




According to the ministry the new outpost ‘is essential to implement highly effective logistical support.’

Djibouti's Foreign Minister Mahamoud Ali Youssouf told Reuters, “We understand that some Western countries have worries about China's willingness to have military outposts outside of China.” He said that Western countries should not be concerned.

He further said that the country is vital in the Horn of Africa situated between the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden. It is a key transfer stop for international humanitarian missions, including those of the United Nations.

Zhang Junshe, a senior researcher at the PLA Naval Military Studies Research Institute, said Djibouti is one of the closest major ports to Somalia. Its peaceful environment is suitable to China's support facility.



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Zhang said the station that China plans to build there is designed to provide food, water and oil. It would be totally different from US military bases, which supply weaponry, Zhang added.

Djibouti's strategic importance was emphasized last year when Chinese citizens evacuated from Yemen transited there.

http://sputniknews.com/asia/20160206/1034344528/china-base-djibouti-fleet.html
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Re: Bases Chinas internacionales - Navales, aereas y combinadas - ubicaciones, infraestructura, notas e imagenes

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 1/3/2016, 11:18 pm




Si habia propositos de establecer una base en Dijibouti, ahora queda claro
que ya iniciaron su construccion, para establecer su base de rehabastecimiento
de su flota internacional que cruce, arribe y se provea de equipo, material y
suministros para su continuo transito hacia operaciones diversas en la zona.
Los limites de autosuficiencia naval, les dara una trayectoria prolongada
que les permita retomar proyectos, posicionar sus naves de avanzada,
y responder de acuerdo a las evoluciones por surgir en el medio oriente.

Paises Europeos, sepan que ya llego a quedarse su lejano vecino: CHINA!!!!


China says starts construction of Djibouti military base


Thu Feb 25, 2016 10:53am GMT Print | Single Page [-] Text [+]
BEIJING (Reuters) - China has begun construction of a logistics base in Djibouti, the Ministry of Defence said on Thursday, what the Horn of African country's government calls a military facility that will be China's first overseas.

Last year, China said it was in talks to build what it describes as naval "support facilities" in the Horn of Africa nation, which has fewer than a million people but is striving to become an international shipping hub.

Djibouti, strategically located at the southern entrance to the Red Sea on the route to the Suez Canal, is already home to U.S. and French bases, while other navies often use its port.

China and Djibouti have reached consensus on the facility, which will be used primarily for military rest and resupply in carrying out naval escort, peacekeeping and humanitarian duties, Chinese Defence Ministry spokesman Wu Qian said.

"Currently, initial construction on the relevant facilities has already started and China has already dispatched some personnel to launch relevant work," Wu told reporters at a regular monthly press briefing.

He did not elaborate.

China had conducted anti-piracy operations in the region in recent years and is seeking to expand its capacity to respond to growing threats to its interests abroad.

President Xi Jinping is reforming the military and investing in submarines and aircraft carriers, as China's navy becomes more assertive in its territorial disputes in the East and South China Seas.

China is also expanding its peacekeeping role, with Xi pledging in September to contribute 8,000 troops for a United Nations stand-by force that could provide logistical and operational experience the military would need to operate farther abroad.

http://af.reuters.com/article/topNews/idAFKCN0VY19U
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Re: Bases Chinas internacionales - Navales, aereas y combinadas - ubicaciones, infraestructura, notas e imagenes

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 8/7/2017, 9:56 pm

PUERTO PAKISTANI COMO BASE CHINA(Puerto Gwadar), no solo involucra su primera base en
el centro entre India e Iran, sino su cercania a la Base en Africa de Djibouti, y
por los acuerdos bilaterales entre China y Pakistan, las rutas terrestres conectadas entre ambas naciones, facilitaran el apoyo logistico de las operaciones Navales Chinas.
 Esto ha desatado una habilitacion por parte de la India, de establecer su propia base
en el sur de la Bahia de Bengal,  en las Islas Andaman, para neutralizar la ya detectada
presencia de submarinos Chinos navegando esas aguas, lo que se espera es que
China tenga su presencia en Bangladesh   o incluso Tailandia, por su fuerte presencia
en la comercializacion de buques navales de fabricacion China.

 La presencia de naves y submarinos Chinos en una negociacion bilateral entre Sri Lanka y China, para recibir y repostamiento de sus Fuerzas Navales en conjunto, mueve las
olas y transforma la percepcion de sus movimientos en el Oceano Indico.
 Esta es una clara Directiva China, que sus costas, no son limitacion para proyectarse
hacia otros mares y oceanos.  

El atribulado Mar del Sur de China, es solo una escala
tecnica de todo el mapa orquestado para la navegacion Militar China en todo su esplendor.



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From Gwadar to Chabahar, the Makran Coast Is Becoming an Arena for Rivalry Between Powers


BY PIR-MOHAMMAD MOLLAZEHI ON 14/06/2016 • 6 COMMENTS
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No matter what role the ports play in the future – intensifying regional and global rivalries or stimulating development – the Makran coast finds itself at the brink of emerging from isolation.

a28c08.jpg


A map depicting parts of the Middle East, South Asia and East Asia. Credit: Iran Review
A map depicting parts of the Middle East, South Asia and East Asia. Credit: Iran Review
The coasts of Makran or Makuran – as it is pronounced by the local people – is a region comprising about 1,500 km of shoreline along the Sea of Oman and the Indian Ocean, which is located in Iran’s Hormozgan, and Sistan and Baluchestan provinces as well as Pakistan’s Balochistan province. Throughout history and before Omani Arabs gained a more dominant position, this shoreline had been recorded in history as the Sea of Makran. The Makran coast starts from Alkouh region north of Iran’s Mina port and is considered an Iranian coast until it reaches the border between Iran and Pakistan in Gwater Bay in Iran’s Sistan and Baluchestan province. Thereafter, that is, from Gwater Bay to Lasbela District, which is located north of Karachi port, it is considered as part of Pakistan’s shoreline. Apart from the strategic importance that the coast of Makran has for the two countries of Iran and Pakistan, this region has been in focus of world powers’ attention for a long period of time, so that, part of regional developments in the past two decades have been associated with efforts made by countries to have access to this coastline.

A history of rivalry

Two port cities – that is, Karachi, which is the capital city of Pakistan’s Sindh province, and Iran’s Bandar Abbas port city – are located on the two ends of the Makran coastline and are of special strategic importance. Within the Makran region there are two more Iranian and Pakistani ports, namely Chabahar and Gwadar ports, which are located in Iran’s Sistan and Baluchestan and Pakistan’s Balochistan provinces and have recently attracted attention of two regional rival powers, that is, India and China. Of course, before the defeat of the former Soviet Union in Afghanistan and prior to total disintegration of the Eastern power bloc, such rivalries were going on behind the scenes between two Eastern and Western blocs. It has been said that Zulfikar Ali Bhutto, a former prime minister of Pakistan and leader of the Pakistan People Party, had gotten very close to signing an agreement in the later years of the 1970s according to which Pakistan was to allow the former Soviet Union to build a naval base in Gwadar port. In other words, some believe that the coup d’état staged by General Muhammad Zia-ul-Haq, a former president of Pakistan, and subsequent execution of Bhutto were not unrelated to the Gwadar project.

The United States’ reaction to that project was a plan to build a naval base in Iran’s Konarak region near the port city of Chabahar, which was aborted following the victory of the Islamic Revolution in Iran. As some analysts have speculated, the occupation of Afghanistan by the Soviet Union was also not unrelated to the Makran coastal region, because after efforts by Russians failed and Americans dominated both sides of the Makran coast, the leaders of the Soviet Union focused on Afghanistan in order to open a new way toward Balochistan and Makran coasts. According to the project planned by Russians, leftist groups related to Russians within borders of the Iranian and Islamic civilisation from Hindu Kush Mountains to Makran coastal region, were expected to come up with a new power structure in the form of some sort of federalism or confederalism. According to this plan, two important ports of Gwadar in Pakistan’s Balochistan and Chabahar in Iran’s Sistan and Baluchestan provinces were supposed to get connected through a network of railroads to Central Asia in order to facilitate military movements of the Soviet Union.

Following the collapse of the second and Eastern power bloc and the subsequent power void, especially in Afghanistan, no major change took place in the nature of rivalries over the Makran coasts and only actors involved in these rivalries became more diverse. It appears that the US and Russia have somehow reduced their attention to this region, but China and India are now engaged in a more serious rivalry over this region. Meanwhile, Afghanistan and Central Asia – which now includes five countries born out of the former Soviet Union – are still the pivot of the “big game.” There are, however, new signs which show that Russia and the US are paying renewed attention to the Makran coasts. At present, however, India and China have changed the nature of their rivalry from “military” to “economic and trade” rivalry and are accordingly planning their presence in two port cities of Gwadar and Chabahar.

Gwadar and Chabahar: ports to development

China and Pakistan look upon the Gwadar port as an active and prosperous economic and trade hub similar to Hong Kong and Singapore and are planning to turn it into a free trade port. If done, this project will not only take Pakistan’s Balochistan province out of its current state of isolation and put it on track for development, but will also give an impetus to development of a bigger geographical region, which extends from China’s Muslim-dominated Xinjiang province to Central Asia, Afghanistan and Pakistan. This is almost the same region, which corresponds to the same Iranian and Islamic civilisation region that was eyed by the former Soviet Union. In addition, various road and rail projects, which have been agreed upon by Pakistan and China and some of them are currently underway – including the Makran highway – will connect Karachi to Gwadar and are telltale signs of the strong political will in Beijing and Islamabad to go ahead with this project.

In addition, China’s presence and investment in Pakistan’s Gwadar port, which is an important part of China’s USD 46-billion deal with Pakistan, is expected to go far beyond simple economy and trade. China is building its first foreign naval base in Pakistan’s Gwadar port so that it would be able to play its role as an emerging power in future developments of South Asia, the Middle East, and Central Asia. According to China’s plan, the Makran highway is to connect Gwadar port through Karakoram region to Kashghar, the capital city of China’s Xinjiang province. In parallel to that highway, a railroad and a gas pipeline are to facilitate China’s access to energy resources in the Persian Gulf and enable it to conduct trade through Gwadar port. Also, railroad and road branches are finally supposed to connect Gwadar to Quetta, which is the capital city of Pakistan’s Balochistan province, while it will be also connected to Afghanistan and Central Asia through the Wesh–Chaman international border crossing between Afghanistan and Pakistan.

In contrast to this joint project by China and Pakistan, Iran and India are bent on implementing a similar project in Chabahar port, which is about 70 km away from Gwadar, in order to use rail and road to connect Chabahar to Sistan and Baluchestan’s capital city of Zahedan. From there, it will be connected to Iran’s national railroad network in the city of Birjand and will then continue to Central Asia. The same railroad will give out a branch in the city of Zabol to enter Afghanistan and make its way into Central Asia. Both projects in Gwadar and Chabahar ports are expected to finally fuel all-out human, economic, trade and cultural development across the entire South Asia and Central Asia while sweeping through Iran and Afghanistan as well. This region is known as the geographical domain of poverty, which is prone to growth of radical religious or ethnic currents which oppose any system of government. An example to the point is the emergence of the Daesh Takfiri terrorist group and its Islamic State, whose purported Greater Khorasan or eastern caliphate corresponds to the geographical region of the Iranian and Islamic civilisation and includes Central Asia and China’s Xinxiang while its extension covers Hindu Kush mountains all the way to the northern Muslim-dominated part of India and the entire Makran coastline.

Renewed rivalries?

It is through such an approach that India’s plan to invest in Chabahar and China’s plan to invest in Gwadar port, both along the Makran coast, must be taken into consideration and rivalries between the two countries for establishing stronger ties with South Asia and Central Asia with the main focus on Chabahar and Gwadar ports must be taken quite seriously. The fact that Narendra Modi was willing to be the first Indian prime minister to visit Chabahar in his recent trip to Iran cannot be understood without attention to these equations just in the same way that the Chinese president became the country’s first leader to pay a visit to Pakistan’s Gwadar port. So, it would be logical to say that the coast of Makran, which had been forgotten for a long period of time, is now in focus of attention of China and India as regional powers due to various reasons, and this interest may later spread to the new Russia and the US. It is even likely that in the forthcoming decades, the Makran coast would play a much more important role that it is playing today.

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi (L) meets Iranian Supreme Leader Sayyed Ali Hosseini Khamenei (C) and Afghan President Ashraf Ghani (R) in Tehran, Iran. May 2016. Credit: Iran Review
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi meets Iranian Supreme Leader Sayyed Ali Hosseini Khamenei (C) and Afghan President Ashraf Ghani (R) in Tehran, Iran. May 2016. Credit: Iran Review
From this viewpoint, the Gwadar port along Pakistan’s Balochistan coastline, and Chabahar port along Iran’s Sistan and Baluchestan shoreline, which are located at a short distance from each other along the Makran coast, can be used for two different purposes. This means that they can turn into two rival ports and further intensify rivalries between China and India, as emerging regional powers, and between Russia and the US at global level. On the contrary, they can turn into two free trade ports and stimulate economic development of this entire poor region in favour of all countries that are situated in the domain of the Iranian and Islamic culture and civilisation. It is not clear yet which one of these possibilities about future outlook of Gwadar and Chabahar will be realised, but what can be said with more certainty is that the Makran coast, both in Iran and Pakistan, is trying to gradually achieve a position, which will be quite different from its isolated and forgotten past.

Correct and timely understanding of this issue and making coordinated plans accordingly is a necessity, which cannot be neglected. Future national and even security interests call for the Makran coast to be looked upon from a totally new standpoint. As a first step, the name “Sea of Oman,” which lacks any historical origin and is a fake term just in the same way that the “Arabian Gulf” is a fake name for the “Persian Gulf,” should be replaced with “Makran.” In the next stages, Chabahar should be enabled to play its connecting role in order to stimulate trade and economy of southeastern Iranian provinces. It can also play the same role for Afghanistan and Central Asian countries in the future and instead of entering into rivalry with the Gwadar port, join hands with the Gwadar port in order for these two important and strategic ports along the Makran coast to be seen as partners complementing each other.

At any rate, China’s powerful presence in the Gwadar port and India’s willingness for powerful presence in Iran’s Chabahar port have provided both Iran and Pakistan with an exceptional opportunity to take advantage of this presence to boost their national and regional development and connect Central Asia, South Asia, the Arab Middle East and the coasts of Africa along the Indian Ocean in favour of all nations situated in these regions. [size=18]The requisite to take correct and timely advantage of the existing conditions along the Makran coast is partnership, not rivalry. The Makran coast should be looked upon from the viewpoint of its all-out development capacities. Through such an approach, the Gwadar port can turn into future Singapore of the region while Iran’s Chabahar could at least match up to Dubai. If this experience could be implemented with no major obstacles, it would greatly boost convergence among countries in the region.[/size]

https://thewire.in/42825/from-gwadar-to-chabahar-the-makran-coast-is-becoming-an-arena-for-rivalry-between-powers/
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Re: Bases Chinas internacionales - Navales, aereas y combinadas - ubicaciones, infraestructura, notas e imagenes

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 12/7/2017, 9:13 pm

Rogersukoi27 escribió:


Si habia propositos de establecer una base en Dijibouti,  ahora queda claro
que ya iniciaron su construccion, para establecer su base de rehabastecimiento
de su flota internacional que cruce, arribe y se provea de equipo, material y
suministros para su continuo transito hacia operaciones diversas en la zona.
 Los limites de autosuficiencia naval, les dara una trayectoria prolongada
que les permita retomar proyectos, posicionar sus naves de avanzada,
y responder de acuerdo a las evoluciones por surgir en el medio oriente.

Paises Europeos,  sepan que ya llego a quedarse su lejano vecino: CHINA!!!!


China says starts construction of Djibouti military base


Thu Feb 25, 2016 10:53am GMT Print | Single Page [-] Text [+]
BEIJING (Reuters) - China has begun construction of a logistics base in Djibouti, the Ministry of Defence said on Thursday, what the Horn of African country's government calls a military facility that will be China's first overseas.

Last year, China said it was in talks to build what it describes as naval "support facilities" in the Horn of Africa nation, which has fewer than a million people but is striving to become an international shipping hub.


http://af.reuters.com/article/topNews/idAFKCN0VY19U


OFICIALMENTE, A PARTIR DE AYER 11 DE JULIO 2017, se define la base de Djibouti, como primera BASE DE SOPORTE MILITAR CHINA, en ese puerto.
Del Puerto de Zhanjiang, partieron naves con personal militar para ser asignado a dicho
puesto, y seran rotados en algunos casos, recibiendo material, equipo y naves para dar apoyo
a sus planes en Africa, asi como respaldar la operacion naviera internacional de esa zona entre otras.
Es evidente que el principal interes de tener presencia en ese pais, es dar respaldo a los intereses
chinos distribuidos internacionalmente.
La evolucion estrategica con equivalencia a una hegemonia selectiva en el orbe, sin duda es
la direccion precisa de China como potencia en desplazamiento elapsado pero seguro.



China Officially Sets Up Its First Overseas Base in Djibouti


China sends military personnel to its new base, designed to support Chinese missions in Africa and the Middle East.

By Charlotte Gao
July 12, 2017



On July 11, China officially dispatched military personnel to set up its first-ever overseas base in Djibouti, the small country in East Africa.

While foreign media call the new facility a “military” base, China instead calls it a “support base,” which “will ensure China’s performance of missions, such as escorting, peace-keeping, and humanitarian aid in Africa and west Asia,” according to Xinhua, China’s news agency.

In the early morning of July 11, China held an official ceremony in the port of Zhanjiang, south China’s Guangdong province. The commander of China’s People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN), Shen Jinlong, “read an order on constructing the base in Djibouti, and conferred military flag on the fleets.” Then Shen ordered, “Set off!” and the ships carrying Chinese military personnel departed the port, reported Xinhua.


In addition to its basic supporting role, the Djibouti base will also perform other functions including “military cooperation, joint exercises, evacuating and protecting overseas Chinese and emergency rescue, as well as jointly maintaining security of international strategic seaways,” said Xinhua.

Regarding China’s reasons for establishing the “support base,” Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi explained that it is meant to help “maintain [China’s] growing overseas interests.”

In an annual press conference held during the 12th National People’s Congress held on March 8, 2016, Wang Yi elaborated on China’s construction in Djibouti:

Like any growing powers, China’s interests are constantly expanding overseas. At present, there are 30,000 Chinese enterprises all over the world… An urgent task for China’s diplomacy is to maintain the growing overseas interests. How to maintain? I would like to tell you clearly that China will never go through the expansion path of the traditional powers, nor will China pursue hegemony. We want to explore a path with Chinese characteristics that both follows the trend of the times and is welcomed by all parties.

Thus, “according to the objective needs and in response to the wishes of the related country,” China will establish some necessary facilities, like its support base in Djibouti. “This is not only reasonable, but also in line with international practice,” said Wang Yi.

So far, it seems that the “related country” — Djibouti — does wish for a greater Chinese presence. China has greatly invested in the tiny Horn of African nation, and included Djibouti in its grand “One Belt, One Road” initiative.

According to Aboubaker Omar Hadi, the chairman of Djibouti Ports and Free Zones Authority, China has already invested nearly $15 billion in Djibouti’s port expansion and related infrastructure development.

Charlotte Gao holds a MA degree in Asian Studies. Her research interests center around East Asian topics. She has worked in the past as a news editor, reporter, and writer for multiple traditional, online, and new media outlets.

http://thediplomat.com/2017/07/china-officially-sets-up-its-first-overseas-base-in-djibouti/

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Re: Bases Chinas internacionales - Navales, aereas y combinadas - ubicaciones, infraestructura, notas e imagenes

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    Fecha y hora actual: 26/7/2017, 3:43 am