Este es un foro dedicado a las Fuerzas Armadas Mexicanas así como de los diferentes Cuerpos de Policía y demás entes que se dedican a la Seguridad interna de México.


Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

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Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 7/8/2015, 3:28 pm



Por lo complejo que se presenta esta zona entre los paises que circundan
esta zona maritima, propongo concentrar la informacion de eventos, acciones
y evolucion entre los paises con disputas sobre estas islas, al igual que las
posibles colisiones y/o acuerdos que se deslinden entre las partes.

Aqui una nota muy fuera de proporcion, al tener por 2 ocasion, una
colision con 2 barcos pesqueros Vietnamitas con un Buque de transporte
Chino (LST) y que no sera la unica que resulte en esta zona en cuestion.

Es importante revelar las posturas de posiciones antagonicas y sus
efectos en la zona. No significa que acaba de empezar, sino que no
se va a detener sin asperezas.







subefotos





Chinese Navy Warship Rammed Two Vietnamese Fishing Vessels

By: Sam LaGrone
August 7, 2015 3:52 PM





sube fotos


An undated photo of a Chinese Type Yuting II Type 072A tank landing ship (LST). PLAN Photo


A People’s Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) amphibious warship allegedly rammed two Vietnamese fishing vessels operating near the disputed Spratly Islands in July, according to local press cited in an Office of Naval Intelligence threat to shipping report.

According to accounts of the fisherman, reported in the Nguoi Lao Dong newspaper, about 15 nautical miles off the western coast of the Spratlys on July 21 “a strange iron-clad Chinese ship numbered 994 suddenly appeared and approached [the fishing vessel] sounding its horn.”

The ship then sprayed the vessels with water cannon and precipitated a 30-minute chase.
“In order to avoid a possible collision, I tried to steer my boat away, but the strange ship still chased after and then rammed it on the right side,” captain Nguyen Nhat Ngoc said to the paper.


Ngoc descried the heavily armed Chinese vessel hit the ship twice more before breaking off the pursuit.

“Bui Thanh Ninh, another local fisherman, said his boat with 13 crew members suffered a similar attack also in the area on [July 23], by the same Chinese ship with code number 994,” reported Thanh Nien News.

According to the Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) recently published PLAN and Chinese maritime law enforcement guide, the only vessel with the hull number 994 is the 4800-ton Yuting II Type 072A tank landing ship (LST) Daiyun Shan (994). The landing ship is more than 100 meters long.

Screen grab of ONI's Chinese ship identification guide. ONI Image


Reports of the incident were collated in the July ONI Worldwide Threat to Shipping (WTS) Report. The report did not connect the hull number to a PLAN ship.

Navy officials told USNI News on Friday the inclusion of the incident on the report — a collection of open source reporting — carried with it no change in the U.S. stance toward Chinese actions in the South China Sea.

Vietnamese fishermen have reported an increase in confrontations with Chinese coast guard and civilian ships since a standoff between Beijing and Hanoi over the presence of a Chinese owned oil-rig for two months in Vietnamese claimed waters in 2014.
“The flare-up in incidents of Chinese vessels ramming Vietnamese fishing boats in recent weeks has come as Vietnam increases high-level contacts with the United States,” reported the The Diplomat in mid-July.



On Thursday, Secretary of State John Kerry gave an unvarnished criticism of China’s growing expansion into the South China Sea and the ongoing campaign to restrict access in the region.

“Freedom of navigation and overflight are among the essential pillars of international maritime law,” Kerry told the East Asia Summit in Kuala Lumpur according to a report in Reuters.

“Despite assurances that these freedoms would be respected, we have seen warnings issued and restrictions attempted in recent months.”

In addition to the uptick in maritime presence, China has also continued a campaign of land reclamation in the Spratlys, most notably constructing a 3,000 meter runway on reclaimed land on the Fiery Cross Reef near the Philippines.


http://news.usni.org/2015/08/07/report-chinese-navy-warship-likely-rammed-two-vietnamese-fishing-vessels
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 10/8/2015, 11:43 pm




Mientras que China sigue construyendo y estructurando sus instalaciones en
las Isletas y atolones convertidos en instalaciones con fines civiles y militares,
las posturas antagonicas, y las declaraciones conjuntas que ponen en aprietos
a la definicion China de soberania sobre las Islas Spratley, sin duda, empalma
las lineas de tolerancia en el transito internacional de vias maritimas, con la
irrenunciable zona economica exclusiva, al igual que las lineas limitrofes
aceptadas entre los vecinos de dicha area en discusion.

Seguir en esta direccion, muestra la postura estrategica de China, de tener
puntos de reabastecimiento, identificar dichas isletas como territorio chino,
y extender su derecho sobre el subsuelo maritimo y sus reservas de minerales
y petroleo, cualquiera que sea su resultado.







China hits back at U.S. criticism over South China Sea ‘restrictions’

REUTERS
AUG 10, 2015

BEIJING – China hit back Monday at U.S. criticism that it restricts navigation and overflights in the South China Sea amid the festering marine territorial dispute with some of its neighbors.

China claims most of the South China Sea, through which $5 trillion in maritime trade passes every year. The Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Taiwan and Brunei have overlapping claims.

Freedom of overflights and navigation doesn’t mean allowing foreign warships and military jets to violate other countries’ sovereignty and security, the Foreign Ministry said in a statement Monday, after U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry accused China of restricting such movements in the region last week.

China sees freedom of navigation in the region as key because it is an important conduit for trade and natural resources, the ministry said.

Kerry told a meeting of regional leaders in Kuala Lumpur last week that China’s construction of facilities on man-made islands for “military purposes” was raising tension and risked “militarization” by other claimant states.

Kerry also criticized “restrictions” put in place in recent months by China, saying the U.S. would not accept any restrictions on freedom of navigation and overflights.

China has repeatedly warned Philippine military aircraft away from the artificial islands in the Spratly archipelago of the South China Sea, Philippine military officials have said.

The Chinese navy also issued eight warnings to the crew of a U.S. P8-A Poseidon surveillance aircraft when it conducted overflights in the area in May, according to CNN, which was aboard the U.S. aircraft.

In June, China said it would soon complete a phase of its reclamation projects, adding it would continue to build facilities on the man-made islands.


Ongoing reclamation activities in the Spratly Islands include civilian facilities for the “public good” including hospitals, maritime research institutes, lighthouses and search and rescue facilities, the Foreign Ministry said.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2015/08/10/asia-pacific/china-hits-back-u-s-criticism-south-china-sea-restrictions/#.Vcl70XF_Okp
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Von Leunam el 11/8/2015, 9:55 pm

Pekín podría construir islas flotantes gigantes en el mar de la China Meridional.

[img]http://cdn.rt.com/actualidad/public_images/2015.08/article/55c95c7fc461882f688b460b.jpg[/img


Las fuerzas armadas chinas podrían crear grandes islas artificiales flotantes como parte del avance chino por la zona en disputa d el mar de la China Meridional, escribe 'Business Insider'. La empresa china de construcción Jidong Development Group ha presentado el diseño de la estructura flotante muy grande (Very Large Floating Structure, VLSF), que se basaría en el mar de la China Meridional, escribe 'Business Insider'. La estructura se compone de numerosos módulos flotantes más pequeños que pueden ensamblarse en el mar con el objetivo de crear una plataforma flotante más grande. Las VLSFs pueden usarse como islas artificiales para fines turísticos o como embarcaderos, bases militares y aeropuertos. El diseño de modulos flotantes, que se asemeja a los bloques de Lego permite que las islas se construyan fácilmente lejos del puerto, según el portal Popular Science.

En teoría las VLSF podrían soportar un número significativamente mayor de aviones que un portaaviones tradicional y tener una pista más larga para acomodar aviones más grandes. Según 'Business Insider' la construcción de VLSFs podría ser parte del avance chino en la región en disputa en el mar de la China Meridional, donde el país ha construido más de 3,8 kilómetros cuadrados de islas artificiales. Taiwán, Malasia, Vietnam y Filipinas también tienen bases militares en islas de este mar. "China está mostrando una notable capacidad para convertir rápidamente los arrecifes de coral en puestos militares, y las VLSFs podrían ser un complemento muy útil a sus sistemas anti-acceso y de negación de área (A2/AD)", ecsribe Jack Detsch en 'The Diplomat'. (Jesús.R.G.)

Fuente: http://actualidad.rt.com/

http://poderiomilitar-jesus.blogspot.ca/2015/08/pekin-podria-construir-islas-flotantes.html
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 21/11/2015, 2:46 pm




Si la continuacion de la construccion artificial de los islotes en el Pacifico Sur, donde
China afirma tener presencia territorial y hegemonía en dichas locaciones, las
fuerzas Navales de E.U. han determinado participar en transito por dichas ubicaciones,
donde las Fuerzas Navales del Japon han ofrecido respaldo a los Filipinos, y en parte
han establecido relaciones de respaldo con equipos y tecnologia para su fortalecimiento
militar en la zona.
Los Chinos no aceptan que les sea replanteado su estrategia, sin tener la aceptacion
y consenso de dichos paises vecinos. La autonomia de los paises del Sur, seguiran
empujando a evitar ser dominados por la evidente presencia militar china en sus
zonas soberanas maritimas economicas, de acuerdo a su geografia natural.
Esperemos no sea la zona que inicie la conflagracion y el encuentro belico de
sus respectivas fuerzas militares!!!!




Japan is considering joining naval patrols in the South China Sea in a move that is likely to anger Beijing.



subir imagenes


Islands. Photograph: Reuters
Justin McCurry in Tokyo
Friday 20 November 2015 08.55 GMT Last modified on Friday 20 November 2015 09.19 GMT




Japan’s prime minister, Shinzo Abe, reportedly told Barack Obama during their meeting on the sidelines of the Apec summit in Manila that Tokyo was open to the idea of patrolling the area – the focus of a territorial dispute involving China and several other countries in the region – after gauging the possible impact on Japan’s security.

Japanese media quoted officials as saying that Abe had told the US president he was “opposed to all unilateral attempts to change the status quo and escalate tensions”, an apparent reference to China’s construction of airfields and other facilities in the disputed Spratly archipelago.



Obama said he and Abe shared “an interest in continuing to foster rule of law and supporting international norms in areas like freedom of navigation and maritime law”.

Japan’s chief cabinet secretary, Yoshihide Suga, confirmed the reports, but said there were no immediate plans for the country’s self-defence forces (SDF) to join US freedom of navigation operations in the South China Sea, which began in October. “At present, the SDF does not continuously conduct surveillance activities in the South China Sea, and we have no such specific plans,” Suga told reporters.

Abe is also considering a request from Manila for coastguard vessels, after Japan agreed to provide the Philippines with defence equipment and technology. Speaking after the agreement, Abe said the Philippine president, Benigno Aquino, had asked Japan to provide two large patrol vessels to the Philippine coastguard.[/size]

[size=24]While Japan has no territorial claims in the South China Sea, it has voiced support for the Philippines and other south-east Asian countries embroiled in territorial disputes with China. It also backed Washington’s decision last month to send the USS Lassen, a guided-missile destroyer, to within 12 nautical miles of two manmade islands belonging to China.


That move prompted an angry response from Beijing, which warned that that further “provocative actions” might lead to accelerated Chinese construction in the area.

Ben Rhodes, the US deputy national security adviser, said Washington believed its presence in the region had a stabilising effect. “Our presence can reassure countries that these disputes are going to be solved consistent with the rules and not through one big nation bullying a smaller one,” he told reporters in Manila.

Chinese development, combined with a heightened naval presence, has led to concern that Japan’s economy could be harmed by an attempt to block freedom of navigation.

The region is home to major shipping lanes through which ship-borne trade worth $5tn (£3.3tn) passes every year, as well as possible oil and gas fields. China insists that its construction projects near the Spratly Islands – where its territorial claims overlap with countries including Vietnam and the Philippines – are peaceful.

Any material Japanese support for countries opposing China’s territorial claims could halt a recent thaw in in ties between Beijing and Tokyo.

Abe and the Chinese president, Xi Jinping, have met twice in the past year, but they have not taken advantage of recent international summits to hold more talks, apparently due to differences over Chinese activity in the South China Sea.


http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/nov/20/japan-could-risk-chinese-anger-by-joining-us-sea-patrols
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 21/11/2015, 2:59 pm






La diplomacia de Obama en este escenario, pareciera demasiado fragil para poner condiciones,
y preparar una postura legal mas clara sobre la soberania de cada territorio y sus zonas
maritimas reconocidas por todos los paises integrantes de la ONU, y sus normas de aguas
internacionales y de libre transito maritimo en sus aguas territoriales.
La China, insiste en tener hegemonia en "sus propias islas", sin dar credito a las zonas
maritimas en las que estan ubicadas.
Ya se anticipa un encuentro belicoso entre vecinos y sus naves reclamando su
patrimonio territorial de artificial a natural!!!!




Obama: countries must stop building islands in disputed South China Sea



imag


President Obama sits with Malaysian Prime Minister Razak at the Asean summit gala dinner in Kuala Lumpur. Photograph: Jonathan Ernst/Reuters
Reuters in Kuala Lumpur
Saturday 21 November 2015 16.56 GMT Last modified on Saturday 21 November 2015 17.04 GMT


President Obama said on Saturday that countries should stop building artificial islands and militarising their claims in the disputed South China Sea.



“For the sake of regional stability, the claimants should halt reclamation, construction and militarisation of disputed areas,” Obama told a meeting between the US and leaders of the 10 members of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (Asean).

China insists it has undisputed sovereignty over most of the South China Sea, a claim that overlaps with four Asean countries.

China has been transforming reefs in the Spratly archipelago into artificial islands and has built airfields and other facililties on them. This has caused ripples of alarm in much of east Asia about China’s intentions and freedom of navigation in a waterway through which $5tn in ship-borne trade passes annually.

Obama said he commended Asean for working to create a code of conduct for the South China Sea “including the peaceful resolution of disputes, freedom of navigation and freedom of overflight”.

Earlier this month, US B-52 bombers flew near China’s artificial islands, signalling Washington’s determination to challenge Beijing over the disputed sea.

China has said it does not want the South China Sea issue to be the focus of the meetings in Kuala Lumpur. Prime Minister Li Keqiang has yet to comment on the issue.

Malaysian prime minister Najib Razak opened the weekend series of meetings earlier on Saturday, calling on world leaders to confront Islamist extremism. The “barbaric acts” of “terrorists” do not represent any race or religion, he declared.

Islamist militants killed 19 people in an attack on a hotel in Mali on Friday before Malian commandos stormed the building and rescued 170 people, many of them foreigners. This came a week after Islamic State militants killed 129 people in coordinated attacks in Paris.

“The perpetrators of these cowardly and barbaric acts do not represent any race, religion or creed, nor should we allow them to claim to do so,” Najib said in his opening speech.


Obama’s Isis quandary: clock ticks on viable strategy as criticism intensifies
Read more “They are terrorists and should be confronted as such, with the full force of the law.”

Malaysia has deployed extraordinary security measures around Kuala Lumpur as leaders from 18 countries, including Obama, arrived for the series of summits.

Obama said on Saturday the Mali hotel attack only stiffened the resolve of the United States and its allies, which would be relentless in fighting those targeting its citizens and would allow militants no safe haven.

“We will continue to root out terrorist networks,” Obama told a meeting of business executives. “We will not allow these killers to have a safe haven.”

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2015/nov/21/south-china-sea-obama-construction-militarisation-malaysia
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 23/11/2015, 12:20 am




Para no dejar pasar que la reunion en el Sur de Asia esta semana pasada, despues de
revisar sus necesidades, planes de trabajo conjunto en medidas de seguridad y anti-
terrorismo, tambien surgen los reclamos de prevenir la invasion de zonas maritimas
exclusivas de las naciones vecinas del Sur de Asia, donde Filipinas le solicita de manera
directa a Japon, que provea buques de mayor calado para realizar la soberania de sus
mares y costas con el respaldo Japones.
Esta invitacion precisa y directa, le da entrada a los Japoneses permanecer y trabajar
en conjunto con los paises que reclaman su autonomia e independencia en dicha zona,
al no permitir que los Chinos construyan islas artificiales frente a sus territorios ya
determinados previamente.
Veremos como se altera el encuentro de Naves de guerra en dicha zona sin que se
encrispen los animos!!!!




Manila asks Japan for large ships to patrol South China Sea


BY AT EDITOR on NOVEMBER 20, 2015 in ASIA TIMES NEWS & FEATURES, JAPAN
(From Reuters)

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe may consider a request from the Philippines for large coastguard ships to patrol the disputed South China Sea, after the two allies reached a deal on defense equipment and technology.


Japan’s Prime Minister Shinzo Abe (L) is greeted by Filipino President Benigno Aquino in Manila Thursday
China has overlapping claims with Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam in the South China Sea, through which $5 trillion in ship-borne trade passes every year.

The Philippines is the Southeast Asian nation most at odds with China over the South China Sea. Tokyo has no claims in the waterway, but worries about China’s growing military reach into sea lanes through which much of Japan’s ship-borne trade passes.

The deal will mark the first time Japan has agreed to directly donate military equipment to another country, and is the latest example of Abe’s more muscular security agenda.

“There was a request from President Benigno Aquino regarding the provision of large patrol vessels to the Philippine Coast Guard and Japan would like to consider the specifics,” Abe said in a statement.

The two leaders met Thursday night at the close of the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Manila.

Abe said he welcomed the deal and “agreed to work together for the early signing of the agreement and the realization of cooperation in defense equipment”.

There have been media reports that Tokyo would supply Manila with three used Beechcraft TC-90 King Air aircraft suitable for maritime surveillance in the South China Sea. Manila had also sought Lockheed Martin submarine-hunting P3-C patrol planes.

Rather than challenge Beijing directly by sending warships or planes to patrol the South China Sea, Japan is helping to build the military capacity of friendly nations with claims to parts of the waterway.

“These negotiations take some time,” a senior Japanese official said, saying it could take one or two years before the two sides sign a deal on defense equipment and technology.

“Japan wants an assurance that any equipment it will give will not be transferred to a third country.”

To allow the donation, Japanese lawmakers will either have to tweak curbs on sales of government-owned equipment, or set up a separate financing mechanism.

Japan is also building 10 40-metre (131-ft) -long vessels for the Philippine coastguard. Manila needs 100-metre (328-ft) -long patrol ships.

Japan changed defense policy this year in a shift that could let troops fight overseas for the first time since 1945. The move was welcomed by ally the United States, but fed concern in China, where memories of Japan’s wartime aggression run deep.

http://atimes.com/2015/11/manila-asks-japan-for-large-ships-to-patrol-south-china-sea/
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 9/12/2015, 2:17 am



Despues de 10 dias de declaraciones de Obama al Lider Chino, que suspendan la construccion
de bases navales en los atolones y las isletas en conflicto territorial con los paises del
Sur de China, ahora los Gringos, han colocado un Poseidon P-8 (BOEING 737), equipado
para detectar submarinos, interferir comunicaciones, detectar lineas de envio de mensajes,
logistica y operaciones de alto riesgo, para asimilar los avances de las instalaciones
militares Chinas en dichas locaciones ya identificadas.
La presencia naval submarina china en diferentes angulos, ha puesto un nuevo punto
de partida en el pais de Singapur, para detectar los movimientos del pacifico al Oceano
Indico, de cualquier equipo de superficie o submarino de dicho pais.

La creacion de empleos que los Chinos estan provocando, son alentadoras noticias
para los aburridos aviones espias que no tienen mucho que hacer!!!!!!





South China sea dispute: US deploys spy plane in Singapore amid tensions

Singapore and Washington stressed the need for a strong US military presence in the region, where the plane was deployed yesterday and will remain until December 14.


By: AFP | Singapore | Published:December 8, 2015 8:34 pm


The US has deployed a P-8 Poseidon spy plane in Singapore for the first time ever, both countries said, amid simmering regional tensions over Beijing’s island- building in the disputed South China Sea. China is locked in a territorial dispute with four Southeast Asian countries – including Washington allies Vietnam and the Philippines – and the US in October sent a warship near the disputed Spratly Islands chain, arguing for its right to freedom of navigation.

Singapore and Washington stressed the need for a strong US military presence in the region, where the plane was deployed yesterday and will remain until December 14. US Defense Secretary Ashton Carter and his Singapore counterpart Ng Eng Hen “welcomed the inaugural deployment of the P-8 Poseidon aircraft”, in a joint statement issued after a meeting in Washington yesterday.

The plane’s deployment “would promote greater inter-operability with regional militaries through participation in bilateral and multilateral exercises”, the statement said. The deployment would also support disaster relief and maritime security efforts, it added.

A separate statement from Singapore’s defence ministry said both ministers “reaffirmed the importance of a strong US presence in the Asia-Pacific in ensuring regional peace and stability”. Regional diplomats said the deployment of the sophisticated spy plane is likely aimed at sending a message to China about Washington’s resolve to oppose what they describe as Beijing’s aggressive moves in the South China Sea, including its building of artificial islands in the disputed waters, through which much of the world’s trade passes.

“The unstated message of course is that this deployment is aimed at China,” a Southeast Asian diplomat said on condition of anonymity. “And the message is that the US is here to stay, ready to support its friends and allies in the region,” the diplomat told AFP.

The P-8 aircraft is a modified Boeing 737 jet equipped with advanced sensors and radar designed to gather intelligence and hunt down submarines. A CNN crew aboard a P-8 Poseidon aircraft that flew from the Philippines over the artificial islands in May said they received repeated warnings from the Chinese navy to leave the area. China claims almost all of the sea, including waters close to the shores of smaller Southeast Asian states. Brunei, Malaysia and Taiwan are the other claimants, but the Philippines and Vietnam are the most vocal against China’s blanket claims.

Singapore is not a claimant, but officials in the city-state say it has an interest in the freedom of navigation because of its open, trade-dependent economy.


http://indianexpress.com/article/world/world-news/south-china-sea-dispute-us-deploys-spy-plane-in-singapore-amid-tensions/
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 14/12/2015, 1:36 pm



Aunque no se han publicado en los medios Chinos imagenes de estos ejercicios navales
con Proyectiles reales en la zona en disputa (Mar del Sur de China), en las redes sociales
segun esta publicacion, ya aparecen algunas tomas de estas naves Chinas realizando
maniobras y disparos reales en objetivos determinados, de acuerdo a su plan de entrenamiento
anual de la Armada China.
Los vecinos de la zona, sin duda estaran atentos a cada movimiento de estos ejercicios,
y sin duda, deja un mensaje claro, que los Chinos en estas locaciones, llegaron para quedarse
quieran o no los paises de Filipinas, Vietnam, Indonesia y Malasia!!!!



China navy carries out more drills in disputed South China Sea
By Reuters | 13 Dec, 2015, 09.03AM IST





BEIJING: China's navy has in recent days carried out more exercises in the disputed South China Sea, the Defence Ministry said on Sunday, calling them routine drills.

China claims almost all of the energy-rich waters of the South China Sea, through which more than $5 trillion of maritime trade passes each year. The Philippines, Brunei, Vietnam, Malaysia and Taiwan have overlapping claims.

"The People's Liberation Army Navy in recent days organised a fleet to go to relevant seas in the South China Sea, by way of the Western Pacific, to carry out exercises," China's Defence Ministry said in a brief statement.

"This action is a routine arrangement made in accordance with this year's naval training plan," it added, without elaborating.


Pictures on social media accounts of Chinese state media have in recent days shown pictures of Chinese navy ships engaged in live-fire exercises in the South China Sea, without saying where exactly they took place.

China periodically announces such exercises in the South China Sea, as it tries to demonstrate it is being transparent about its military deployments.

China has been at odds with the United States of late over the strategic waterway.

Washington has criticized Beijing's building of artificial islands in the South China Sea's disputed Spratly archipelago, and has conducted sea and air patrols near them.

Last month, US B-52 bombers flew near some of China's artificial islands and at the end of October a US guided-missile destroyer sailed within 12 nautical miles of one of them.

China expressed concern last week about an agreement between the United States and Singapore to deploy a US P8 Poseidon spy plane to the city state, saying the move was aimed at militarising the region.


http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/defence/china-navy-carries-out-more-drills-in-disputed-south-china-sea/articleshow/50157351.cms

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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 14/12/2015, 1:44 pm




Anexo las primeras imagenes disponibles en otras fuentes, de los ejercicios navales de China
en la zona en disputa de las isletas y atolones ahora a ser tenencia de dicho pais.





upload imagem



uploading images


image hosting 10mb limit



https://twitter.com/PDChina
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 4/1/2016, 5:29 pm



Ya tenemos el primer hervor de las Islas Spratley (posicion de la isla en cuestion es
reclamada por Vietnam), donde China realiza su primer prueba de la pista construida
en dicha isla, bajo la autoridad China, y donde ellos proclaman que es territorio y
soberania China, y donde Vietnam, reclama que no vuelvan a realizar despegues
de ningun tipo de aeronave desde esa isla.
Si ya probaron con nave de tipo civil (se presume que no tenga signos militares en
el mismo para reducir la presion de la opinion mundial), solo resta que trasladen
a escuadrones de alta capacidad de navegacion, y sin duda, empezara a tener
movimientos de Vigilancia, supervision y quizas de advertencias diferentes a las
naves y unidades militares que circunden dicha ubicacion.
Las siguientes medidas, empezaran a tener sus elevaciones, y sin duda, seran
causales para tensionar las relaciones diplomaticas y quizas de otro tipo de
respuestas belicas!!!!






China defends test flight in South China Sea after Vietnam objects



Hong Kong (CNN)China has defended conducting a test flight on a newly built airfield on reclaimed land in disputed waters in the South China Sea after objections from Vietnam.

Hua Chunying, China's foreign ministry spokesperson, said Saturday that a civilian aircraft used by the Chinese government conducted a test flight at the new airport on Fiery Cross Reef in the Spratly Islands.

Hua said the activity is "entirely within the range of China's sovereignty concerns.
"

Vietnam's Ministry of Foreign Affairs said it considered the action a serious infringement of the sovereignty of Vietnam on the Spratly Islands and asked China to not to repeat the flight.

Japan also expressed concern Monday, with Foreign Minister Fumio Kishida saying such acts "don't contribute to the peaceful settlement of the dispute" and "should be avoided."

Dotted with small islands, reefs and shoals, the South China Sea is home to a messy territorial dispute that pits multiple countries against each other.

In the past two years, the United States says China has reclaimed some 2,000 acres of land --- equivalent to 1,500 football fields -- in a massive dredging operation, turning tiny sandbars into islands equipped with airfields, ports and lighthouses.

While China is not the only country to have an airstrip in the disputed waters, it's the only country to have one capable of handling a bomber.

The U.S. has called for "an immediate and lasting" halt to the island building.

In September, Beijing summoned the U.S. ambassador after a U.S. warship sailed within 12 nautical miles of reefs claimed by Beijing.

In May, a U.S. surveillance plane carrying a CNN crew flew over some of the artificial islands, triggering eight warnings from the Chinese navy to back off.

http://edition.cnn.com/2016/01/03/asia/china-vietnam-south-china-sea/




READ: Satellite images suggest China 'building third airstrip' in South China Sea

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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 19/1/2016, 10:06 pm


Las acciones empiezan a escalar, las unidades de vigilancia Costera China, que
no tenian armamento abordo, ahora fueron convertidas en Fragatas con unidades calibres
de 30 y 40, para ponerse a la par con as Patrullas costeras Japonesas, y el hecho que
ya esten enviando viajes comerciales a las islas de ahora nacionalidad China, con
la aerolina oficial China Southern, que transportan personal (civil) y personal
de las mismas para realizar diferentes tareas.
Lo que ha despertado el acelere, es saber que es seria la postura Japonesa de enviar
conjuntos de la Naval a esa zona del Sur de las islas, y la Naval China ha enviado
ALERTA para detectar cualquier movimiento cercano a dicha zona, y con las flotas
de las naciones circunvecinas.
Calentando la zona y a estar atentos a los efectos que se aproximen!!!!




China on ‘High Alert’ to Prevent Japan from Entering South China Sea Disputes

By: Sam LaGrone
January 19, 2016 12:44 PM • Updated: January 19, 2016 5:16 PM
hinese Sailors man the rails aboard the destroyer Qingdao (DDG 113) as they arrive in Pearl Harbor. US Navy Photo
hinese Sailors man the rails aboard the destroyer Qingdao (DDG 113) as they arrive in Pearl Harbor. US Navy Photo

Chinese officials claim to be on “ high alert against Japan’s attempt to poke its nose in the issue of the South China Sea,” following an interview published Sunday in which Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe called for the international community to “raise its voice” against Chinese encroachment.

On Sunday, in a wide-ranging interview with The Financial Times, Abe addressed the development of Chinese installations and its moves into the East China Sea.

“Japan, he says, ‘harbors very strong concern’ over China’s building of artificial islands in the South China Sea and its attempts to develop resources in the East China Sea close to Japan, [with Abe] calling for the international community to ‘raise its voice’,” wrote the paper.

After completing its program of artificial island creation earlier last year, China has made moves from those installations in the South China Sea that have made its regional neighbors anxious.

A Chinese airliner operating from China's airfield on Fiery Cross Reef in the South China sea in January. Xinhua Photo
A Chinese airliner operating from China’s airfield on Fiery Cross Reef in the South China sea in January. Xinhua Photo

In the last few weeks, China’s airfield on Fiery Cross Reef, in the middle of the South China Sea has been declared operational and hosted commercial flights.

In the East China Sea, Chinese Coast Guard cutters – converted People’s Liberation Army Navy frigates – entered waters near the Japanese administered Senkaku Islands last month sparking the ire of Tokyo and a pledge to interdict future violations with Japanese Maritime Self Defense patrols.

China and Japan also have a long standing dispute over mineral rights in the East China Sea.

In response to Abe’s interview, Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesman Hong Lei told reporters Beijing was within its rights to build on the territory on the Spratly Islands [Nansha] and again called out Japan for its record in World War II.

“Construction by China on relevant islands and reefs of the Nansha Islands falls within China’s sovereignty. It is legitimate, reasonable and justified. Japan once snatched from China islands in the South China Sea during the Second World War. The Chinese government retrieved them after the War. Japan should reflect upon rather than forget what it has done during the aggression, act and speak cautiously on issues concerning the East China Sea and the South China Sea, and make more efforts to increase mutual trust with its neighbors and promote regional peace and stability instead of sowing discord.”

Last year, Japanese officials said they reserved the option to patrol in the South China Sea – an idea U.S. regional commanders have supported – but had no immediate plans to do so.

The following is an excerpt from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs Jan. 19, 2016 press conference.

Q: In his recent interview with the Financial Times, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said that Japan harbors very strong concerns over China’s building of islands in the South China Sea and development of resources in the East China Sea. He called on the international community to raise its voice against this. What is China’s response to that?

A: China’s oil and gas development activities in the East China Sea are all conducted in undisputed waters under the jurisdiction of China. They are within the realm of China’s sovereign right.

China has indisputable sovereignty over the Nansha Islands and their adjacent waters. Construction by China on relevant islands and reefs of the Nansha Islands falls within China’s sovereignty. It is legitimate, reasonable and justified. Japan once snatched from China islands in the South China Sea during the Second World War. The Chinese government retrieved them after the War. Japan should reflect upon rather than forget what it has done during the aggression, act and speak cautiously on issues concerning the East China Sea and the South China Sea, and make more efforts to increase mutual trust with its neighbors and promote regional peace and stability instead of sowing discord. China is on high alert against Japan’s attempt to poke its nose in the issue of the South China Sea.

http://news.usni.org/2016/01/19/china-on-high-alert-to-prevent-japan-from-entering-south-china-sea-disputes


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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 28/1/2016, 12:44 am




Ahora que esta recien electa la primera Presidenta Mujer de Taiwan, va a visitar
la isla que reclama como propia (ITU ABA - TAIPAN ISLAND) misma que vienen
reconociendola como propia desde 1956, y ahora que esta CHINA, tomando a la
brava atolones e islotes, con la excusa de haber instalado fuertes, pistas y
muelles para recibir las flotas y naves de suministros, mismas que proveeran
de equipos ademas de otros dispositivos para su fortalecimiento estrategico.

Que manera de arrebatarse el territorio maritimo elevando sus propios Labaros
Patrios en dichas posiciones!!!!!





Taiwan’s President Ma to Visit Disputed South China Sea Island

Ma Ying-jeou plans to visit Itu Aba tomorrow, to the consternation of the U.S. and Vietnam.

shannon-tiezzi
By Shannon Tiezzi
January 28, 2016

Current Taiwanese President President Ma Ying-jeou plans to visit a disputed island in the South China Sea tomorrow, a presidential spokesperson said on Wednesday. Ma will visit Taiping Island, also know as Itu Aba, the largest natural island in the Spratly group. Mainland China, Malaysia, the Philippines, and Vietnam all have competing claims to the Spratlys. Taiwan has controlled Itu Aba, since 1956; today it houses around 200 personnel from Taiwan’s coast guard, navy, and air force.

Ma will be visiting the island ostensibly to greet the troops ahead of the Lunar New Year, according to Presidential Office spokesperson Charles Chen. Ma will be accompanied by “20 government officials, scholars, and experts,” according to Taiwan’s Central News Agency. It will be Ma’s first visit to the island, although his predecessor, Chen Shui-bian, also took a trip to Itu Aba in February 2008.

The timing in both cases is fascinating – in both instances, the sitting president was well into a lame-duck period, with a member of the opposition party already having been elected to replace him (in Chen’s case, Ma of the Kuomingtang or KMT had just won election; this time around, the Democratic Progressive Party’s Tsai Ing-wen is set assume the presidency on May 20). The DPP was invited to send an envoy along on Ma’s trip, but spokesperson Yang Chia-liang said the party had no plans to take part.

Itu Aba has come into focus recently thanks to its inclusion in the Philippines’ arbitration case against China’s claims in the South China Sea. Manila’s case argues that Itu Aba is a rock, not an island, under the provisions of the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) – meaning it would not be entitled to a 200 nautical mile exclusive economic zone. Taiwanese officials (including U.S. Representative Lyushun Shen, in an interview with The Diplomat) have countered that, as a land feature with naturally occurring fresh water and agricultural production, Itu Aba qualifies as an island. Taiwan is not directly involved in the arbitration– and indeed, was excluded from sending observers to the oral arguments – but Taipei is trying to make sure its case is heard nonetheless. Ma’s visit is part of that effort.

Taiwanese media previously reported that Ma was scheduled to visit Taiping in December for a ceremony to commission a new wharf and lighthouse. However, Interior Minister Chen Wei-zen and Coast Guard Administration Minister Wang Chung-yi presided over the December 12 ceremony instead. Taiwan still publicized the visit as an indication of Taiwan’s sovereignty over the disputed island, and of Itu Aba’s status as an island. After Chen and Wang’s trip, Taiwan emphasized that they ate food farmed on the island, and sent pictures of Itu Aba’s produce and livestock to the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative as proof. The photos also showed Taiwan’s infrastructure on the island, including the new wharf and lighthouse as well as the pre-existing airstrip, hospital, and administration building.

Read in this context, Ma’s visit to Itu Aba is designed to even more firmly convey Taiwan’s control over the island, as well as the argument that Itu Aba is, in fact, an island rather than what Philippine Foreign Secretary Albert del Rosario called a “potemkin island” in his closing remarks before the arbitral tribunal. Though Taiwan officially claims all the Spratlys, as well as the Paracels and other features in the South China Sea, Itu Aba is the only feature actually occupied by Taiwan, and thus is critically important to preserving its presence in the region. Taipei has been moving to solidify its control over the island, including building new infrastructure (such as the recently completed wharf) and mulling boosting its defense presence.

Ma’s visit has sparked strong opposition from the American Institute in Taiwan, which functions as a de facto U.S. embassy in the absence of official diplomatic ties. “We are disappointed that President Ma Ying-jeou plans to travel to Taiping Island,” AIT spokesperson Sonia Urbom told Reuters, calling the move “extremely unhelpful.”

Likewise, Vietnam’s top official in Taiwan, Tran Duy Hai, said Hanoi “resolutely opposes” Ma’s visit to Itu Aba, saying, “If he goes, it will raise tensions in the area.”

Beijing however, was not bothered by the move, which it sees as in tandem with its own claims to the South China Sea. “Safeguarding national sovereignty and territorial integrity as well as safeguarding the overall interests of the Chinese nation is the common responsibility and obligation of compatriots across the straits,” Ma Xiaoguang, a spokesperson for the Taiwan Affairs Office, told reporters.

Taiwan has struggled to strike the right balance in its South China Sea approach, between staunchly defending its claims (which are virtually identical to mainland China’s, as they are based on the same maps created by the Republic of China) and positioning itself as a positive influence in the region, promoting the use of international law. Ma’s South China Sea Peace Initiative was designed to meet both ends. Without giving up any of Taiwan’s claims, the initiative called for all parties to shelve disputes, respect UNCLOS, and explore the joint development of resources. The plan never got any traction, though, having been overshadowed by China’s artificial island-building and the Philippines’ arbitration case.

Ma’s visit to Itu Aba will bring the focus back to Taiwan, if only for a few days. As the saying goes, any publicity is good publicity – even scoldings from other regional players can achieve the purpose of reminding the world that Taiwan, too, is a player in the South China Sea.

http://thediplomat.com/2016/01/taiwans-president-ma-to-visit-disputed-south-china-sea-island/
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 30/1/2016, 2:25 pm

Mientras que los paises que colindan con el Mar del Sur de China (Vietnam, Filipinas, Indonesia, obvio Taiwan y en parte Brunei), siguen reclamando su propiedad de islotes que China ha
tomado como propias, aumentando la tension en dicha zona.
 Taiwan sigue reclamando su hegemonia en la Isla Itu Aba, estando muy cercana
a las ubicaciones de islotes ahora reclamados por China continental.
  No sera sorpresa que diferencias por sus zonas exclusivas, provoquen enfrentamientos!!!!




South China Sea: Taiwan's President Ma in disputed island visit

By Katie Hunt and Paul Armstrong, CNN

Updated 0536 GMT (1336 HKT) January 28, 2016



screenshot program
 

Hong Kong (CNN)Taiwan's president has paid a visit to an island in disputed waters in the South China Sea, in a show of sovereignty that has drawn criticism from the United States.

Outgoing President Ma Ying-jeou landed Thursday on Taiping Island, also known as Itu Aba, a small land mass it controls more than 990 miles (1,600 km) south of Taiwan in the Spratly islands archipelago, the Office of the President said.

Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia and Brunei also lay claim to all or part of the Spratlys, while China claims most of the South China Sea.

President Ma met with coastguard personnel and said that several islands in the disputed waters belonged to the Republic of China (ROC) -- Taiwan's official name. He pledged to resolve disputes peacefully.

Ejercicio naval en Islas Spratley (ITU ABA/TAIPING ISLAND) con su Corbeta de diseño propio
para recibir a la recien elegida Presidenta en dicha isla. La toma de posesion tendra lugar
el proximo Mayo del presente.



image upload no limit



"The Nansha (Spratly) Islands, Shisha (Paracel) Islands, Chungsha (Macclesfield Bank) Islands, and Tungsha (Pratas) Islands, as well as their surrounding waters, are an inherent part of ROC territory and waters, and the ROC enjoys all rights over these islands and their surrounding waters in accordance with international law. This is indisputable," Ma said, according to a statement.

It is the first such visit by the island's president since Ma's predecessor Chen Shui-bian went to the island in February 2008.



Before Ma's visit, the American Institute in Taiwan, the de facto U.S. embassy, had said that it was disappointed by the planned trip.

"Such an action is extremely unhelpful and does not contribute to the peaceful resolution of disputes in the South China Sea," a spokeswoman said.

The U.S. "urges Taiwan and all claimants to lower tensions, rather than taking actions that could raise them," she added.


Tensions have risen over the past two years as Beijing has embarked on a massive land reclamation program -- turning sandbars into islands equipped with airfields, ports and lighthouses.

Earlier this month, Vietnam objected to China landing a plane on a man-made island in the Spratlys. Then last week, the two neighbors were involved in another terse exchange over China's operation of an oil drilling rig in waters claimed by both countries.

IMAGEN DE FRAGATA DE TAIWAN Clase Lafayette(Francia).


photo uploader



President Ma's visit comes barely a week after Taiwan elected its first female leader in a landslide election win.

China reacted with caution to the stunning victory by Tsai Ing-wen and her Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), with an editorial in the state-run Xinhua news agency stating that there was "no denying that the DPP's return rule poses grave challenges to cross-strait relations."

The incumbent Ma is considered friendly towards Beijing and met with China's President Xi Jinping in November, the first talks between the leaders of the two side since the split in 1949.

A statement from China's Taiwan Affairs Office quoted by Xinhua said it resolutely opposed "any form of secessionist activities seeking 'Taiwan independence.'"

Meanwhile, the Central News Agency quoted DPP spokesman Yang Chia-liang as saying the party had turned down an invitation from President Ma's office for President-elect Tsai to send an envoy on the trip.

Tsai will take office in May.

http://edition.cnn.com/2016/01/28/asia/south-china-sea-taiwan-president-ma/index.html
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 31/1/2016, 8:21 pm




Si deseamos que las aguas esten tranquilas, y las turbias corrientes lleguen a su
nivel normal, ahora tenemos que CHINA SE A DECLARADO EN ALERTA MAXIMA,
debido a la postura mas activa de las Fuerzas Navales Japonesas, para dejar
claro que no dejara que China tome, someta y adquiera el mar territorial que
le corresponde a los paises vecinos de las formaciones de coral, islotes e islas
ya ubicadas en las 200 millas nauticas del litoral de cada pais, para ubicar la
hegemonia y la nacionalidad de los mismos.
China objeta que dicha ubicacion geografica, este limitada por la distancia
litoral de cada asentamiento. Ellos reclaman lo que por decadas han entendido
como patrimonio de la humanidad.
¿ SERA DE TODOS LOS RECLAMANTES? Rolling Eyes study




China on ‘High Alert’ to Prevent Japan from Entering South China Sea Disputes


By: Sam LaGrone
January 19, 2016 12:44 PM • Updated: January 19, 2016 5:16 PM




Chinese officials claim to be on “ high alert against Japan’s attempt to poke its nose in the issue of the South China Sea,” following an interview published Sunday in which Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe called for the international community to “raise its voice” against Chinese encroachment.[/size]

On Sunday, in a wide-ranging interview with The Financial Times, Abe addressed the development of Chinese installations and its moves into the East China Sea.

“Japan, he says, ‘harbors very strong concern’ over China’s building of artificial islands in the South China Sea and its attempts to develop resources in the East China Sea close to Japan, [with Abe] calling for the international community to ‘raise its voice’,” wrote the paper.

After completing its program of artificial island creation earlier last year, China has made moves from those installations in the South China Sea that have made its regional neighbors anxious.
A Chinese airliner operating from China's airfield on Fiery Cross Reef in the South China sea in January. Xinhua Photo

A Chinese airliner operating from China’s airfield on Fiery Cross Reef in the South China sea in January. Xinhua Photo

In the last few weeks, China’s airfield on Fiery Cross Reef, in the middle of the South China Sea has been declared operational and hosted commercial flights.

In the East China Sea, Chinese Coast Guard cutters – converted People’s Liberation Army Navy frigates – entered waters near the Japanese administered Senkaku Islands last month sparking the ire of Tokyo and a pledge to interdict future violations with Japanese Maritime Self Defense patrols.

China and Japan also have a long standing dispute over mineral rights in the East China Sea.

In response to Abe’s interview, Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokesman Hong Lei told reporters Beijing was within its rights to build on the territory on the Spratly Islands [Nansha] and again called out Japan for its record in World War II.

[size=18]“Construction by China on relevant islands and reefs of the Nansha Islands falls within China’s sovereignty. It is legitimate, reasonable and justified. Japan once snatched from China islands in the South China Sea during the Second World War. The Chinese government retrieved them after the War. Japan should reflect upon rather than forget what it has done during the aggression, act and speak cautiously on issues concerning the East China Sea and the South China Sea, and make more efforts to increase mutual trust with its neighbors and promote regional peace and stability instead of sowing discord.”


Last year, Japanese officials said they reserved the option to patrol in the South China Sea – an idea U.S. regional commanders have supported – but had no immediate plans to do so.

The following is an excerpt from the Chinese Ministry of Foreign Affairs Jan. 19, 2016 press conference.

Q: In his recent interview with the Financial Times, Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said that Japan harbors very strong concerns over China’s building of islands in the South China Sea and development of resources in the East China Sea. He called on the international community to raise its voice against this. What is China’s response to that?

A: China’s oil and gas development activities in the East China Sea are all conducted in undisputed waters under the jurisdiction of China. They are within the realm of China’s sovereign right.

China has indisputable sovereignty over the Nansha Islands and their adjacent waters. Construction by China on relevant islands and reefs of the Nansha Islands falls within China’s sovereignty. It is legitimate, reasonable and justified. Japan once snatched from China islands in the South China Sea during the Second World War. The Chinese government retrieved them after the War. Japan should reflect upon rather than forget what it has done during the aggression, act and speak cautiously on issues concerning the East China Sea and the South China Sea, and make more efforts to increase mutual trust with its neighbors and promote regional peace and stability instead of sowing discord. China is on high alert against Japan’s attempt to poke its nose in the issue of the South China Sea.

http://news.usni.org/2016/01/19/china-on-high-alert-to-prevent-japan-from-entering-south-china-sea-disputes

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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 9/2/2016, 9:36 pm




Una cosa es tener DOMINANCIA a generar INFLUENCIA!!!!
Las posturas que van en direcciones opuestas con respecto a la "LIBERTAD DE TRANSITO",
versus la de "TERRITORIO SOBERANO", presenta antecedentes historicos, mismos que en
en los ultimos 2 siglos, el que posee el poder para determinar las directrices de accion
(dominio o imposicion de reglas del juego en turno) pareciera que estan cambiando
desde el inicio del siglo XXI.
Ahora, los paises se han tenido que aliar o aglomerar, para presentar un frente que no
de una sola cara, sino el consenso hacia una NORMA INTERNACIONAL que facilite el
statuos quo de hace esos siglos donde solamente la policia internacional (E.U. y sus compas)
determinaban finalmente quien era el que tenia la razon.
Ahora, los protagonistas del orden mundial (en el Mar Sur de China en especifico ahora)
sustentan y actuan para establecer sus propias reglas, aunque no tengan la misma direccion.

Calentar la zona, solo estimula la accion promotora de vender mas armas, para equiparar o presentar una postura defensiva-disuasiva del que aspira a ganar la capacidad instalada y mobil mas potente que las actuales.

Seguiremos midiendo los avances de ambas facciones (literalmente constituidas como facciones opuestas a no dejarse someter).



Why the South China Sea needs Japan’s Navy


BY AT EDITOR on FEBRUARY 2, 2016 in ASIA TIMES NEWS & FEATURES, CHINA, JAPAN
(From the National Interest)

By Takuya Shimodaira

Twenty-five years after the end of the Cold War, the Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) remains a Cold War navy. As U.S. Naval War College professor James Holmes has argued, the JMSDF has been designed to fill specific niches in partnership with the United States in combating the threats that would have emanated from the Soviet Union; thus, we have seen particularly proficient capabilities like antisubmarine warfare and minesweeping. Is now the time for the JMSDF to change its mind about its goals, fulfilling a new security role in the region and in the world as partners of the United States as spelled out under the Japanese policy of a “Proactive Contribution to Peace”?


In the changed conditions of the twenty-first century, the most realistic security approach for the JMSDF will involve more so-called “Non-Combat Military Operation” (NCMO) missions, like Humanitarian Assistance/Disaster Relief and anti-piracy operations in the Asia Pacific region in conjunction with the U.S. Navy.

We are already seeing movement on this front. The guidelines for U.S.-Japan defense cooperation were revised in April 2015. Bilateral security cooperation is likely to strengthen in the new future. The U.S.-Japan alliance has already been a key element of the regional security architecture in the Asia-Pacific region. The future will likely contain a more balanced and robust role for Japan, as well as enhanced security cooperation between Tokyo and other U.S. partners in the region, such as the Philippines and Australia.

A New Arena: the South China Sea

The U.S. Navy and the JMSDF find themselves on the front lines in the Asia-Pacific region as maritime security challenges increase. China has made dramatic increases in military spending, and is building up its own anti-access/area denial capabilities to deny the U.S. entry in its near seas. It poses a threat to neighboring countries in the East China Sea (ECS) and the South China Sea (SCS). The SCS serves as a major choke point for Chinese naval power projection toward the Indo-Pacific region. As China’s strategic position in these waters has improved, Beijing has been able to act much more assertively throughout the region.

This has raised a fundamental question as to whether China will use its growing military and economic power to assert its own national interests without respect to international norms. The South China Sea issue—China’s creation of artificial islands and extending its claims for its maritime zones—represents a typical challenge to “freedom of navigation” based on international rules.

China, of course, maintains that its intentions are peaceful and constructive. Beijing defines the SCS as “a sea of peace, friendship, and cooperation.” Premier Li Keqiang issued a five-pronged proposal to uphold and promote peace and stability in the SCS at the Eighteenth ASEAN-China Summit in Malaysia in November 2015. What is interesting is that it explicitly states that countries from outside the region (e.g., the United States) should undertake to respect and support the efforts by countries in the region to uphold peace and stability in the SCS (that is, the arrangements that China reaches with its neighbors).

At this summit, the United States and Japan raised concerns about the SCS, about how key shipping routes would be safeguarded and how the significant oil and gas deposits under its waters might be apportioned. In particular, they brought up the possible threat to freedom of navigation posed by Chinese activities. The countries in the region do not want an aggressive and powerful China pursuing its own interests. They must react assertively to what the Chinese are doing, which means being prepared to vigorously uphold the existing rules about maritime operations, including the rights of vessels to engage in navigating open waters.

Some critics say that the United States and Japan ought not to intervene in this regional issue, as putative “outsiders” to the SCS. However, the United States has been a Pacific power promoting regional peace and stability for decades, and the U.S.-Japan relationship has been a pillar of stability throughout the entire region. Increasingly, the JMSDF should be prepared to play a greater role with U.S. allies in the Asia-Pacific region. Japan should look for creative solutions to the challenges we face in the SCS and the JMSDF ought to consider what burdens it can be prepared to assume. We need to take seriously statements made by U.S. leaders, including President Obama, that the United States cannot function as the world’s policeman.

The New Importance of Maritime Power

The words and deeds of President Xi Jinping are so conspicuous. Xi proposed that China should take the initiative in its neighboring states. PLA has been striving to modernize, preparing for local wars under conditions of informationization.

As China rises and becomes increasingly powerful, it will want to dominate the Asia Pacific region. Xi’s vision of “One Belt, One Road” lays out a strategy for China, as a continental power, to consolidate a sphere of influence in the Asia-Pacific area, allowing Beijing to take the initiative in defining regional policy. The United States and Japan must address the direct challenges that China poses to regional security.

http://atimes.com/2016/02/why-the-south-china-sea-needs-japans-navy/
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 17/2/2016, 3:17 pm





SE LEVANTA EL TELON!!!!!

De todo el espectaculo "comercial y de buenas intenciones chinas" en sus islas artificiales
desarrolladas por ellos mismos, ahora presentan como primera fase, la instalacion
de bases lanzadoras de misiles (seguramente seran anti-aereos y anti-navales) para
proteger lo que esten desarrollando o para garantizar las actividades sin amenazas
de ser invadidos o atacados. Para empezar lo instalaron en la Isla Woody de Spratley!!!
Con este gesto "DEFENSIVO" sin duda va a crear un alzamiento de la linea de
medicion para ver quien tiene mas equipos y cuales son mas potentes!!!!!



Beijing places missile launchers on disputed South China Sea island


Tensions in region could rise after satellite images appear to show two batteries of missile launchers and radar system on Woody Island

Wednesday 17 February 2016 11.37 GMT Last modified on Wednesday 17 February 2016 17.37 GMT
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China has deployed surface-to-air missile launchers on an island in the South China Sea, satellite images appear to show, dramatically upping the stakes in a territorial dispute involving the US and its regional allies.

Tensions in the South China Sea, a vital shipping route, could rise after two batteries of eight missile launchers and a radar system were deployed to Woody Island in the past week, according to images taken by the private company ImageSat International.

The images were first published by Fox News. The Chinese foreign minister, Wang Yi, did not deny that missile launchers had been installed but said the reports were an attempt by certain western media to create news stories.

“As for the limited and necessary self-defence facilities China has built on islands and reefs stationed by Chinese personnel, that is consistent with the self-defence and self-preservation China is entitled to under international law,” he said.

A foreign ministry spokesman also sidestepped confirming the deployment, but did say: “Whether or not to deploy defence facilities on islands is totally within China’s sovereignty. It has nothing to do with militarisation.”


South China Sea: US bomber angers Beijing with Spratly islands flypast
Read more
The development, later confirmed by the Taiwanese defence ministry, reverberated through an Asean (Association of South-East Asian Nations) leaders’ meeting in California, hosted by Barack Obama. Several Asean countries have overlapping claims to islands and surrounding waters in the South China Sea, including Malaysia, Brunei, Vietnam and the Philippines. China claims most of the area, which is thought to have significant oil and gas reserves and is a route for roughly £3.17tn in trade.

At Tuesday’s meeting Obama said freedom of navigation must be upheld and lawful commerce should not be impeded. “The US will continue to fly, sail and operate wherever international law allows,” he said. “We will support the right of other countries to do the same.”

Satellite images of the beach. ImageSat said that while the setup appears temporary, ‘we expect to see construction of a suitable complex in the near future’.
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Satellite images of the beach. ImageSat said that while the setup appears temporary, ‘we expect to see construction of a suitable complex in the near future’. Photograph: Copyrights by ImageSat International N.V. © 2016
The Vietnamese premier, Nguyen Tan Dung, on Monday called for the US to play a larger role in demilitarisation of the South China Sea and have a “stronger voice”.

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Beijing’s reported ability to shoot down planes with anti-aircraft missiles is likely to alarm Asean members, who might add further pressure on the US to attempt to halt China’s military expansion.

Woody Island is claimed by China, Taiwan and Vietnam, which calls it Phú Lâm Island. The island has been under Chinese control since 1974, according to the US national security thinktank, the Center for a New American Security.

Taiwanese general David Lo told Reuters that Taiwan would closely watch subsequent developments. “Interested parties should work together to maintain peace and stability in the South China Sea region and refrain from taking any unilateral measures that would increase tensions,” he said.

An image dated 14 February showed the presence of the equipment, whereas the same area looked to be empty in an image dated 3 February. Fox News cited a US official as saying the images appeared to show the HQ-9 air defence system, which had a range of about 125 miles and could therefore threaten any nearby planes.

The Vietnamese foreign ministry did not immediately reply to a request for comment..

Asked about the missile move, a US state department spokesman said: “While I cannot comment on matters related to intelligence, we do watch these matters very closely. The United Sates continues to call on all claimants to halt land reclamation, construction, and militarisation of features in the South China Sea.”

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/feb/17/china-places-missiles-woody-south-china-sea-islands
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 17/2/2016, 9:33 pm




Sin dejar pasar la nota de haber detectado en la Isla Woody a traves de satelite,
la imagen comparada entre el pasado 4 de Febrero y el 17 de febrero anexa,
presenta la distribucion de lanzadores en plena costa.
No se explica que esten en plena arena, cuando normalmente se prepara el terreno,
y se realizan preparaciones para su montaje y estabilizacion de la instalacion.


img upload



http://www.smh.com.au/world/south-china-sea-dispute-chinese-missiles-in-paracels-says-fox-news-20160217-gmw6zl.html
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 20/2/2016, 1:04 pm



Si la publicacion anexa señala haber instalado en la ISLA WOODY 8 lanzadores de misiles anti-aereos HQ-9, las imagenes que incluyo (fuente STRATFOR) muestran un conjunto mayor a solo 8 lanzadores. Los desarrollos en dicha isla, siguen creciendo, y sin duda tendran
otras instalaciones para crear presencia de personal militar y movimientos adicionales
que veremos, sin duda se elevara la escalacion de mayores equipos, tensiones y sin
duda las alianzas de paises de la zona para no olvidar sus zonas territoriales!!!!


China has deployed 8 surface-to-air missiles on a contested island in the South China Sea
Amanda Macias and Reuters
Feb. 16, 2016, 10:22 PM


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After President Obama's summit with leaders of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), Taiwan's defense ministry confirmed that China deployed surface-to-air missiles to a disputed island in the South China Sea.

Satellite imagery from ImageSat International shows two batteries of eight surface-to-air-missile launchers as well as a radar system on Woody Island, part of the Paracel Island chain in the South China Sea.

A US military official said the imagery appears to show the HQ-9 air-defense system, which has a range of 125 miles and would pose a threat to any airplanes, civilian or military, flying close by, Fox News reports.

http://www.businessinsider.com/china-has-deployed-8-surface-to-air-missiles-on-a-contested-island-in-the-south-china-sea-2016-2



ANEXO IMAGENES PUBLICADAS POR STRATFOR


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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 20/2/2016, 1:32 pm




Vietnam, el vecino mas cercano a la Isla Woody, levanta protestas por la instalacion de estos equipos militares sobre la zona en disputa de las 200 millas nauticas de
sus litorales para reclamar todo asentamiento en dicha zona, como territorio
vietnamita. Y los Chinos no se detendran ante esos pequeños reclamos de paises
aparentemente pequeños, mas con una determinacion a defender sus reclamos.




Hanoi lodges protest over Chinese missiles


People staging a demonstration yesterday at the Chinese consular office in Makati city, south of Manila, to protest against China's apparent deployment of a surface-to-air missile system on Woody Island in the South China Sea. While Chinese officials
People staging a demonstration yesterday at the Chinese consular office in Makati city, south of Manila, to protest against China's apparent deployment of a surface-to-air missile system on Woody Island in the South China Sea. While Chinese officials refused to deny or confirm the deployment, China's Defence Ministry has confirmed "China has deployed weapons on the island for a long time", reported the Global Times newspaper.PHOTO: EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY
PUBLISHEDFEB 20, 2016, 5:00 AM SGT

It expresses deep concern, citing 'serious infringements of sovereignty' over the Paracels
HANOI • Vietnam lodged a formal protest with China and the United Nations yesterday, saying it was "deeply concerned" over Beijing's apparent deployment of an advanced surface-to-air missile system on a disputed island in the South China Sea.

"These are serious infringements of Vietnam's sovereignty over the Paracels, threatening peace and stability in the region as well as security, safety and freedom of navigation and flight," Foreign Ministry spokesman Le Hai Binh said in a statement.

The statement said diplomatic notes had been sent to China's embassy in Hanoi and United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki Moon to protest against Beijing's move.


Taiwan, which also claims the Paracels, and United States officials said on Wednesday that the missile system had been deployed to Woody Island, the largest of the China-controlled Paracel chain.

While Chinese officials have refused to deny or confirm the deployment, China's Defence Ministry has confirmed that "China has deployed weapons on the island for a long time", reported the Global Times newspaper. It did not specify what these were.

US Secretary of State John Kerry slammed China for its increased "militarisation" in the South China Sea and said Washington expects to have "very serious" talks with Beijing.

Australia and New Zealand yesterday also voiced alarm over the news that Beijing has sent what appeared to be HQ-9 missiles to Woody Island. These weapons have a range of 200km.



"We urge all claimants in the South China Sea to refrain from any building of islands, any militarisation of islands, any land reclamation," Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said after meeting his New Zealand counterpart John Key in Sydney.

"It is absolutely critical that we ensure that there is a lowering of tensions," he added.

POSSIBLE SHOW OF FORCE

While these air defence systems provide a notable military capability, their presence on the island does not necessarily reflect a major escalation. They are packed closely together on a sand platform near the waterline in a way that suggests they are either part of a training operation or a conspicuous show of force.

THE STRATFOR REPORT
Mr Turnbull said that if Chinese President Xi Jinping was serious about avoiding the so-called Thucydides Trap, where a rising power causes fear in an established power that escalates towards war, he must resolve disputes through international law.

Chinese Foreign Ministry spokesman Hong Lei criticised Australia and New Zealand for their remarks, saying they were not involved in the South China Sea. "We hope the two countries can objectively view the historical developments of the South China Sea, not neglect the facts, and not put forward proposals that are unconstructive," he said at a regular press briefing.

New imagery obtained by the US-based Stratfor global intelligence firm, and released to its clients yesterday, showed a higher- resolution view of the activities taking place across Woody Island.

Specialists at AllSource Analysis have identified two batteries of HQ-9 surface-to-air launchers, as well as supporting vehicles such as an engagement radar and the Type 305B AESA acquisition radar, said Stratfor in its analysis.

"While these air defence systems provide a notable military capability, their presence on the island does not necessarily reflect a major escalation.

"They are packed closely together on a sand platform near the waterline in a way that suggests they are either part of a training operation or a conspicuous show of force," said the Stratfor report.

The visibility of the deployment raises the possibility that it was intended to send a political message, said Stratfor, which noted that news of the deployment coincided with the US-Asean summit at Sunnylands in California.

At the summit on Monday, Vietnamese Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung suggested to US President Barack Obama that Washington take "more efficient actions" against militarisation and island- building.

http://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/hanoi-lodges-protest-over-chinese-missiles
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 20/2/2016, 2:13 pm



La version CHINA no levanta revuelo de su instalacion de estaciones misileras anti-aereas en la Isla Woody de las Parecel, cercana a Vietnam.
Todo lo declara como normal, que dicha isla pertenece a China por generaciones
y que no tiene propositos de militarizacion.
Los 2 lenguajes que no se escuchan ni se entienden mutuamente; versiones que tendran
otros encuentros cuando no haya forma de detener el siguiente o siguientes pasos de
expansion.



MISSILES DEPLOYMENT ON XISHA NOT MILITARIZATION: CHINA


Beijing—China’s Foreign Ministry says the deployment of ground-to-air missiles on the Xisha Islands in South China Sea does not constitute militarization.
The ministry says the islands belong to China.
“The Xisha Islands are China’s inherent territory. They are not disputed islands. For the past decades, China has been deploying homeland defense facilities. This is nothing new.
We hope relevant countries will not deliberately hype the issue, and will do more that is condusive to regional peace and stability.
China’s deployment there has nothing to do with militarization,” said Chinese Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Hong Lei.—Xinhua

http://pakobserver.net/2016/02/20/missiles-deployment-on-xisha-not-militarization-china/
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 20/2/2016, 2:30 pm



Y el Japon, tambien lanza un comunicado confirmando la instalacion de esos misiles,
y solicita al gobierno Chino que de una explicacion convincente del proposito de dicha
implementacion.
Ya puso nervioso al vecindario, y no se espera que se reduzca el ritmo de sus
avances en los diferentes islotes que ellos proclaman como territorio nacional.



Japan Asks China for Convincing Explanation of Missile Deployment

TOKYO - Japanese Defense Minister Gen Nakatani Friday asked China to give a "clearer and more convincing" explanation of its recent deployment of anti-aircraft missiles on an island in the disputed South China Sea.

Japan has confirmed the deployment, undertaken last week in Woody Island, through satellite images of the island and other sources, Nakatani told the press, public broadcaster NHK reported.

The minister also restated Tokyo's opposition to "unilateral actions to change the status quo" in the region, such as the construction of outposts and their use for military purposes, and stressed the unanimous concern of the international community about such actions.

Tokyo continues to collect information about Chinese activities in the South China Sea after the missile deployment, and feels the action will escalate tension in the region.

The defense minister also recalled Chinese President Xi Jinping's remarks about not militarizing the South China Sea during his visit to Washington in September last year.

The Paracel archipelago is controlled by China, however Taiwan and Vietnam stake claims of sovereignty over it.

The South China Sea region has witnessed escalated tensions since last year after it was revealed that Beijing has built military installations in islets and reefs in the Spratly Islands, partially controlled by China, the Philippines, Taiwan, Vietnam and Malaysia.



http://www.laht.com/article.asp?ArticleId=2405993&CategoryId=12395
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 21/2/2016, 2:04 pm


Con la colocacion de unidades anti-aereas chinas en la isla de Woody, ahora los
voceros militares de E.U., estan enunciando se quede claro sobre el libre transito de
aguas internacionales asi como de los comunes transitos de naves aereas militares
de los E.U. sobre amplios espectros del Oceano, sin dejar de mencionar que no han
tenido propositos belicos durante sus trayectos, y que el comun entendido entre
China y E.U. ha sido tomado con buen sentido.

Ahora, El vocero de la Armada de E.U. señala que no desea que se lancen en la
region los esperados viajes de cazas y bombarderos despegando de dichas islas
que ahora poseen instalaciones de aeropuertos, y que se perciben como zonas
que incrementaran el cruce de naves de transito y los tipicos abordajes paralelos
para señalar el espacio aereo invadido por sus viajes no pre-autorizados.

Cuando se ve venir el siguiente movimiento, ya lo estan resaltando para que
no queden sospechas de los posibles resultados que puedan tener si no se
amplian criterios y normas en ese mar del Sur de China donde todos viajaban
y cruzaban sin que nadie se les pusiera un hasta aqui.






Top U.S. Navy official warns against Chinese fighter flights from South China Sea runways
REUTERS
FEB 15, 2016

SINGAPORE – Any move by China to fly fighter jets from runways on its new man-made islands in the disputed South China Sea would be destablizing and would not deter U.S. flights over the area, a senior U.S. naval officer said Monday.

Vice Adm. Joseph Aucoin, the commander of the U.S. Navy’s Seventh Fleet, also urged Beijing to be more open over its intentions in the South China Sea, saying it would relieve “some of the angst we are now seeing.”

“We are unsure where they are taking us,” Aucoin said of China’s recent moves during briefing with journalists in Singapore.

“So we are going to sail, fly, operate throughout these waters … like we have been doing for so long,” he said.

That, he added, included “flying over that airspace.”

Chinese and regional security analysts expect Beijing to start using its new runways in the disputed Spratlys archipelago for military operations in the next few months.

It last month tested for the first time the 3,000-meter runway built on a reclamation on Fiery Cross Reef by landing several civilian airliners from Hainan island.

Aucoin said he could not give an estimate when he expected Chinese military jets to start operating in the Spratlys.

“It’s a destablizing uncertainty,” he said when asked about the impact of possible Chinese jet fighter patrols. He said it would raise questions about the intentions.

China claims much of the South China Sea, while Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam have rival claims.

International concern is growing over tensions in the waterway, which carries an estimated $5 trillion in trade every year, including oil used by Northeast Asian nations.

Since last October, two U.S. warships have sailed close to Chinese claimed features in the Spratly and Paracel archipelagoes in so-called freedom-of-navigation operations that Beijing has warned are provocative.

Chinese officials complained last December that a U.S. B-52 bomber flew close to one of Beijing’s artificial islands.

Other U.S. surveillance and transport planes routinely fly throughout the South China Sea.

Chinese warships and civilian vessels routinely flank U.S. naval ships in the area, but Aucoin said engagement between the two navies would continue, saying the relationship was “positive.”

“(The) International Law of the Sea has helped (China) for so many years. We just want them to respect those rights so that we can all continue to prosper,” he said.

http://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2016/02/15/asia-pacific/top-u-s-navy-official-warns-chinese-fighter-flights-south-china-sea-runways/#.VsoVepwrLIV
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 22/2/2016, 4:33 pm



Ya los Gabachos tuvieron la antelacion de tener radares de Alta Frecuencia durante la
previa Guerra Fria con los Sovieticos, e instalaciones para propositos de deteccion
temprana de movimientos aereos de dicho origen los estuvieron implementando y
actualizando hasta la fecha.
Ahora los Chinos, habiendo aprendido las tripas electronicas de estos equipos, tienen
ya instalados estos radares en las costas continentales para anticipar llegada de
intrusos a su territorio.

Para no dejar atras su vision de soberania en las instalaciones artificiales del
Mar del Sur de China (Islas Paracel por lo pronto (solo afecta a Taiwan y Vietnam), y seguramente en un futuro inmediato en las Spratley - mismas que causaran estas ultimas mas revuelta en
el vecindario por atentar contra varias naciones) podemos anticipar que las naves
de los paises vecinos, que intentan disfrazar sus naves con diseño/capacidad furtiva
a los radares, con esta alta frecuencia podran detectar, enlazar y conectar a las
redes de misiles anti-aereos y poder neutralizar su posible entrada a las zonas
circundantes a dichas islas.

Que no se quejen despues que no tienen libre transito aereo en dichas zonas porque
los Chinos estan preparando su anticipada soberania ante cualquier animoso que
se jacte de saber mover las olas y vientos mejor que ellos!!!!
!



New Possible Chinese Radar Installation on South China Sea Artificial Island Could Put U.S., Allied Stealth Aircraft at Risk

By: Sam LaGrone
February 22, 2016 3:19 PM
A Jan. 24, 2016 image of Cuarteron Reef in the South China Sea with what is likely a high frequency radar array. CSIS Asian Maritime Transparency Initiative, DigitalGlobe Image used with permission.


A possible new Chinese radar installation in the South China Sea could put American and allied stealth aircraft at risk as part of a wider detection network similar to U.S. efforts to find Russian bombers in the Cold War.

Late January satellite imagery from the Center for Strategic and International Studies and DigitalGlobe show the installation of what’s likely a high frequency radar installation the Chinese disputed holding of Cuarteron Reef near the Philippines.

The imagery from DigitalGlobe shows a field on the island with 65 foot-tall poles in a field on reclaimed land on the reef – China’s southern most holding in the region – that are similar to other maritime HF radars, Greg Poling, head of the center’s Asian Maritime Transparency Initiative told USNI News on Monday.

“Why would you have 20-meter poles spread across this features if it’s not high frequency radar? ” Poling said.
“Maybe a giant tarp?”

It’s unclear from the imagery if the site on Cuarteron is operational and inquires left with the Department of Defense by USNI News on Monday were not immediately answered. The Washington Post first reported the installation early Monday afternoon



Bryan Clark, a maritime analyst at the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments (CSBA), said that while a high frequency radar on the island could have some law enforcement value – like similar radars the U.S. uses to detect drug runners in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean — it’s more likely an HF radar on Cuarteron has more secretive military use to detect stealth aircraft.

Similar U.S. and Russian radars can detect surface targets at ranges well over the horizon – 80 to 200 miles. However Chinese and Russian versions are set to also notice the presence of low observable aircraft, Clark said.

“If I’m China, this is what I want to install so I can monitor maritime and aviation contacts,” he said.
“It’s got a nice dual use. It can find other aircraft that would be hard to find with traditional early warning radar frequencies.”

China has already installed similar radars on its coastline that are used to detect the presence of stealth aircraft.



images hosting



A Jan. 24, 2016 image of Cuarteron Reef in the South China Sea with what is likely a high frequency radar array. CSIS, DigitalGlobe Image used with permission.
A Jan. 24, 2016 image of Cuarteron Reef in the South China Sea with what is likely a high frequency radar array. CSIS, DigitalGlobe Image used with permission.

A possible HF array on Cuarteron could feed what its detects back to mainland China through data links to provide information to radars capable of better targeting stealth aircraft less real estate to scan and then route that data to anti-air warfare missile systems.

The setup “gives you some indications and warning that there are stealth aircraft in the area,” Clark said.

In particular, U.S. stealth aircraft – like the Northrop Grumman B-2 Spirit bomber and Lockheed Martin’s F-22 Raptor and F-35 Lighting II Joint Strike Fighter – are optimized against HF radars.

Higher frequency radars – on their own — can tell when a low observable or stealth aircraft is in its range but do not have the fidelity to lock weapons. However — as reported by USNI News in 2014 — Russia and China both are perfecting lower band radar that could successfully target low observable aircraft working in conjunction with an HF early warning system. The radars could also provide information to Chinese fighters a general idea where to intercept an adversary.

In addition to the U.S., Australia and Japan are in the process of acquiring F-35s.

An F-35C Lightning II carrier variant joint strike fighter conducts a touch and go landing aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN-68). US Navy Photo

The U.S. used a similar idea when it create the Distant Early Warning line to detect Russian bombers starting in the late 1950s.

“It’s the same idea as the DEW Line,” Clark said of an HF array on Cuarteron.
“You could look at this as extending the range of their early warning radars.”

Chris Carlson, a retired U.S. Navy captain and analyst told USNI News that the installation on Cuarteron was much smaller than other similar mainland arrays and its unclear how well the secondary function of the radars would work at the size seen in the images released on Monday.

Additionally, given the location near the Philippines, the alleged HF installation on Cuarteron could also monitor U.S. aircraft movements in the country at long range — all in a package with which China can claim for civilian law enforcement uses, Clark said.

“They can say this is for fishery enforcement and maritime domain awareness and that’s what China will probably claim,” he said.


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Beijing has repeatedly said the new installations on the reef, also home to a lighthouse completed in October, are to provide “better public services and goods for the international community,” according to a Monday press briefing with Ministry of Foreign Affairs spokeswoman Hua Chunying.

Last week satellite imagery of Woody Island in the Paracel chain near Vietnam revealed more than 30 mobile anti-air warfare missiles had been placed on the island – raising questions on China’s peaceful intent in the region.

Beijing implicitly defended the move of the HQ-9 system to Woody Island – confirmed last week by Foreign Minister Wang Yi.

“The Chinese side is entitled to safeguard its territorial sovereignty and maritime rights and interests,” Hua said later in her Monday briefing.
“China’s deployment of limited defense facilities on its own territory is its exercise of self-defense right to which a sovereign state is entitled under international law. It has nothing to do with militarization. It is something that comes naturally, and is completely justified and lawful. The U.S. should view that correctly instead of making an issue of that with deliberate sensationalization [sic].”

http://news.usni.org/2016/02/22/new-possible-chinese-radar-installation-on-south-china-sea-artificial-island-could-put-u-s-allied-stealth-aircraft-at-risk
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 25/2/2016, 11:09 am



Para calentar mas la zona, el dia de ayer, el Comandante de la Flota Naval del Pacifico
de los E.U. declaro que aumentaran el transito de sus naves por el Mar de Sur de
China, como practica aceptada internacional del libre trafico por las aguas internacionales.
Esta interpretacion, mas que negar ser una provocacion, es tentar las nuevas
instalaciones Chinas en sus islotes, mas el incremento de un submarino nuclear
adicional en dichas aguas.
La clara posicion a la fecha, es no incluir un grupo naval de Portaviones en dicha zona

por el momento.
Veremos las declaraciones y acciones Chinas despues de estos torridos encuentros por venir.



U.S. Navy will sail more in the South China Sea


Adm. Harry B. Harris, Jr., commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet, addresses the audience during the Navy Wounded Warrior - Safe Harbor 2015 Pacific Trials closing ceremony, Image: US Navyzoom
Adm. Harry B. Harris, Jr., commander of U.S. Pacific Fleet, addresses the audience during the Navy Wounded Warrior - Safe Harbor 2015 Pacific Trials closing ceremony, Image: US Navy
The U.S. Navy will sail, fly and operate wherever international law allows, Admiral Harry B. Harris, Commander of the United States Pacific Command, said at an Armed Services House committee hearing yesterday, February 24.

The U.S. Navy Admiral, in confirmation of U.S. fears, said that China was “clearly militarising” the region by setting up missile launchers on the disputed islands.

Chinese foreign minister Wang Yi, when asked about the missile launchers and radars, did not deny anything and reasoned that the “limited and necessary” defence facilities on the islands were within international law regulations.

Asked about what could be done to stop China in its intentions and deter militarization, Harris said he believes a stronger naval presence might do the job. He added that the U.S. Navy could consider putting another attack submarine in the region, among other options which would not entail a full-blown carrier group.

The Admiral, however, did note that an enhanced engagement could face certain “fiscal and political hurdles”.

As the tensions in the region are constantly on the rise, U.S. officials are continuing to endorse the freedom of navigation policy in the South China Sea, most of which China claims for itself.

http://navaltoday.com/2016/02/25/u-s-navy-will-sail-more-in-the-south-china-sea/
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Re: Islas en conflicto en Sudasia- Spratley,Paracel - conflictos, documentacion, acuerdos y articulos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 1/3/2016, 10:28 pm



El dia de ayer, Lunes 29 de Febrero, se firmo el acuerdo bilateral entre JAPON y FILIPINAS,
para generar transferencia de equipo nuevo y usado, asi como apoyo logistico entre
ambos paises, para aumentar sus capacidades defensivas mutuas, mismas que tendran
que involucrar equipo de tecnologia no instalada actualmente en ninguna posicion de
las islas Filipinas.
Ademas de los ejercicios navales conjuntos, otras transferencias de entrenamiento,
practicas de coordinacion conjunta tanto naval como aerea y de vigilancia regional,
seran vectores a cubrir en los proximos meses y años a definir.
Malasia, Indonesia, y Vietnam, esperan ser consideradas dentro de los pilares de
apoyo y coordinacion en la zona para tener coordinados esfuerzos y posiciones
de monitoreo, vigilancia y defensa en el mar del Sur de China.




South China Sea Controversy 2016 Update: Japan And Philippines Sign Defense Agreement Amid Regional Uncertainty
BY LYDIA TOMKIW @LYDIATOMKIW ON 02/29/16 AT 8:41 AM


Japan will supply the Philippines with defense equipment after leaders from the two nations signed an agreement Monday as tensions remain high in the disputed South China Sea region, the Associated Press reported.

“Let me stress that what underpins this agreement is not only our desire to enhance our respective defense capabilities but also to contribute to regional peace and stability,” Filipino Defense Secretary Voltaire Gazmin said, adding the agreement will also include technology supplies and joint development projects. The agreement is the first of its kind for Japan in the region.

Both countries stayed clear of directly mentioning aggressive Chinese moves, including what appears to be the installation of advanced radars on the Spratly Islands, Reuters reported. Ahead of the agreement signing, Gazmin said, “It’s not directed against any country.”

China has said it will defend its sovereignty in the South China Sea; General Wang Jiaocheng of the newly created Southern Command Theater has told Chinese media he will focus on protecting the country's regional interests.

“The military will be capable of dealing with any security threat. No country will be allowed to use any excuse or action to threaten China’s sovereignty and safety,” Wang said, according to a translation from the South China Morning Post.

Japan and the Philippines will hold additional talks to decide what defense equipment will be supplied, with reports saying Tokyo has offered surveillance aircraft as well as both new and used equipment. The Philippines has looked to both Japan and the U.S. as it works to modernize its military amid mounting uncertainty in the region it calls the West Philippine Sea. Japan announced in January that it would increase its air patrols around Vietnam and the Philippines.

The South China Sea is an economically important maritime trade area, with Brunei, China, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam all laying claims to areas. Approximately $5 trillion worth of trade moves through the region every year.

http://www.ibtimes.com/south-china-sea-controversy-2016-update-japan-philippines-sign-defense-agreement-amid-2327098

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