Este es un foro dedicado a las Fuerzas Armadas Mexicanas así como de los diferentes Cuerpos de Policía y demás entes que se dedican a la Seguridad interna de México.


muere Sidney Valpy Radley-Walters

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muere Sidney Valpy Radley-Walters

Mensaje por radagast el 25/4/2015, 3:54 pm

RIP Sidney Valpy Radley-Walters
It is with regret that I must inform you that another distinguished veteran passed on on 21.4.2015 - Sydney Valpy Radley-Walters CMM, DSO, MC, CD. Radley-Walters was a renowned Canadian tank commander during WW2.



El general de brigada Radley-Walters era el as tanque de puntuación superior de Aliados occidentales en WW2. Él luchó a través de Normandía hasta el final a Alemania y continuó su distinguido servicio hasta 1974 cuando se retiró. Descanse en paz!

http://ritastatusreport.blogspot.nl/2015/04/rip-sidney-valpy-radley-walters.html

perdon por no ponerlo el jueves
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Re: muere Sidney Valpy Radley-Walters

Mensaje por radagast el 25/4/2015, 3:55 pm


"Truly one of our great war heroes"

By Sean Chase, Daily Observer

Friday, April 24, 2015 7:55:11 EDT PM

GARRISON PETAWAWA - Brig.-Gen. Sydney Radley-Walters, who emerged from the pivotal Normandy campaign as not only one of Canada's most respected battlefield commanders but the Commonwealth's top tank ace, has died at the age of 95.

Developing strategy and doctrine still used by the Royal Canadian Armoured Corps to this day, the legendary tactician recorded a stunning 18 tank kills but his biggest hit was likely the elimination of Michael Wittman, the notorious Panzer commander behind the destruction of 168 allied tanks - the most of the Second World War. For his courage and leadership, he received the prestigious Military Cross personally from King George VI.

"Rad," as he was universally known, made history again in 1957 when he became first commanding officer of the 8th Canadian Hussars. Towards the close of his stellar career, he commanded Base Petawawa during the October Crisis of 1970. Although he wore many cap badges, he was first and foremost a Royal Canadian Dragoon and held several key command appointments with the storied Petawawa-based armoured unit including a tenure as regimental second-in-command.

"General Rad was truly one of our great war heroes," Lt.-Col. Steve Graham, commanding officer of the Royal Canadian Dragoons, said Friday. "With his passing the corps has lost one of the defining leaders of our history."

Born the son of a pastor on Jan. 11, 1920 in Malbay, Quebec, Sydney Valpy Radley-Walters attended Bishop’s College before the war altered his destiny. In 1940, he was commissioned as an infantry officer in the Sherbrooke Fusiliers. When the unit was redesignated 27th Canadian Armoured Regiment two years later, he donned the black beret and re-qualified as an armoured officer. While his professionalism and ingenuity allowed him to climb the ranks, he was a leader who cared for his soldiers. By the time "Rad" landed on Juno Beach with the second wave on June 6, 1944, he was the second-in-command of his squadron.

"He was just a magnificent individual," said retired major general Clive Milner, a former commanding officer of the Dragoons. "As a soldier his record stands for itself."

From his Sherman tank, nicknamed "Caribou," he scored his first direct hit a day after the allied landings destroying a Panzer IV near Saint-Germain-la-Blanche-Herbe. Nine days later, the 24-year-old was promoted to major and assumed command of the squadron. Courageous and unwavering, the young officer's daring nearly cost him his life on numerous occasions during the vicious Battle of Caen. He had three tanks shot out from under him and was twice wounded. Nevertheless, Radley-Walters intimate knowledge of combined arms tactics, using a mix of infantry, artillery and armoured to secure an objective, was almost unparalleled. After every skirmish with the Germans, he debriefed his crews on mistakes they made and what they could improve thus introducing the modern-day "lessons learned" system of training still employed in the Canadian Armed Forces today.

"He was an innovator in terms of tactics," said Maj. Chris Catry, operations officer with the Canadian Army Doctrine and Training Centre in Kingston. "He took every sort of lesson possible from every engagement and later imparted that knowledge and experience to successive generations of the armoured corps."

Radley-Walters was one of the first to up-armour his Shermans' weak spots lying sandbags on the floors to protect his crewmen. He also discovered the weakness of the seemingly invincible Tiger tank by hitting the driver’s compartment. His most important victory may have been the death of the feared Waffen-SS commander Michael Wittman.

On Aug. 8, 1944, the Iron Cross winner, nicknamed the "Black Baron," was killed when rounds blew off the turret of the Tiger he was riding. A gunner with a British unit was initially credited with the kill, however, historians have since discovered that Radley-Walters' Fusiliers could have fired the fatal shot. Beyond the controversy, his wartime accomplishments are still revered by new generations of tankers who place him in the same sphere as Major-General Frederic Worthington, long considered the father of the Canadian armoured corps.

"We grew up hearing the stories of his successes in the Normandy campaign and you can't help but be inspired by that," added Lt.-Col. Graham, who once had the privilege of acting as an aide to the retired brigadier general. Those stories and his wisdom captivated the members of the Dragoons whenever the war commander visited Petawawa's Worthington Barracks. "You knew you were in the presence of someone pretty unique."

Fighting through Belgium and Holland, Radley-Walters reached Germany by VE-Day. By war’s end, he had knocked off 18 German tanks, the best kill record of any Canadian or Commonwealth commander. For his gallantry he won the Distinguished Service Order and the Military Cross, which he received from Field Marshal Montgomery and later George VI at Buckingham Palace. After the war, Radley-Walters remained in the regular army and served as chief instructor at the armoured school in Borden, Ontario (he would later command it). There, he used those invaluable wartime experiences to mold the tankers of tomorrow including Milner, who was an officer cadet when he first met his mentor.

"He could take soldiers and young officers out of the classroom and into reality," explained Milner. "He could take them into the field and make it real and bring it to life for them. There are thousands of Canadians who have been touched by this man. He was the genuine article."

In 1949, he was posted to Petawawa where he served as second-in-command of the Dragoons. In 1952, he was appointed to the Canadian Army Staff College in Kingston before moving over to the 1st Canadian Infantry Division headquarters. After his tour of command with the 8th Canadian Hussars, "Rad" spent a year at Supreme Headquarters Allied Powers Europe in France. In 1968, he was promoted to the rank of brigadier-general and appointed commander of the 2nd Canadian Infantry Brigade Group based at Base Petawawa. He also doubled as the base commander until 1971.

His final posting was Gagetown, New Brunswick were he served as commander of the Combat Training Center. Upon his departure from the military in 1974, he donated a sword to be presented to the militia armoured officer who achieved the highest standard on the Reserve Entry Scheme Officer course.

Radley-Walters retired to a farm near Killaloe. Parking a Sherman tank and other decommissioned armoured vehicles to the property, it became a living museum to the general’s career and later opened up the grounds for school class trips. Radley-Walter's granddaughter, Allison, said she will have fond memories of her grandfather showing her how to fish and corral cattle.

"My grandfather wasn’t afraid of hard work and he had the same high expectations of his children and grandchildren. A day with him might involve corralling escaped cattle or walking along the densely forested perimeter of the Percé property. No whining allowed. A day with him always involved some kind of adventure and it always involved a few good stories," she said. "He loved showing us how to fish, how to plant and harvest vegetables, how to eat all kinds of seafood, and how to defend ourselves should we ever be in a knife fight without cutting ourselves. He taught us to work hard, never taking for granted each day we have together on this earth."

In 2003, he sold the farm and moved to Kingston, where he spent his remaining years. His son, Grant Radley-Walters, serves as a justice at the Pembroke provincial court. Funeral services for Brig.-Gen. Sydney Radley-Walters will be held on May 9 at Anglican Cathedral Church of St. George in Kingston.

Sean Chase is a Daily Observer multimedia journalist

http://www.thedailyobserver.ca/2015/04/24/truly-one-of-our-great-war-heroes



    Fecha y hora actual: 12/12/2017, 5:35 pm