Este es un foro dedicado a las Fuerzas Armadas Mexicanas así como de los diferentes Cuerpos de Policía y demás entes que se dedican a la Seguridad interna de México.


  • Publicar nuevo tema
  • Responder al tema

Posturas, apuestas y errores políticos internacionales - escenarios, reuniones y acuerdos

Comparte
avatar
Rogersukoi27
General de División
General de División

Mensajes : 10203
Masculino
Edad : 59

Posturas, apuestas y errores políticos internacionales - escenarios, reuniones y acuerdos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 23/9/2014, 9:19 pm


Abro este tema, donde compartire, agregare documentos y analisis, y aquellos interesados en mostrar el bagaje y equipos queinvolucra estas +ultimas versiones, ocurrencias y posturas, donde el aparato bélico esta en jaque-mate de ciertos frentes, y los ejecutores de estrategias y diseños de tecnologia de punta,
no han podido resolver y responder en tiempo y forma, hacia las amenazas y fortalezas de paises
astutamente en preparación.
Bienvenidos a los temas de analisis, sintesis y confirmacion!!!!!
Firmes



(Acercandose a conocer la Armada China; compartir los secretos de los portaviones, es una mala idea!)


Visitas en fechas diversas, entre mandos Chinos y Norteamericanos, compartiendo diplomacia con
equipamiento en reserva, alimenta las expectativas, y denosta las flaquezas de ambos bandos,
donde el agrupamiento mas preocupado, resulta ser: Paises asiaticos de Filipinas, Vietnam, Taiwan, y en parte Japón al no estar evolucionando en forma y tiempo para atenuar la flexibilidad que China esta
actuando y pensando mostrar en cualquier lugar y momento.

Getting to Know the Chinese Navy

Sharing carrier secrets is a bad idea
.



SEP 22, 2014, VOL. 20, NO. 02 • BY STEVE COHEN
Share on email9Send to Kindle
Single PagePrintLarger TextSmaller TextAlerts
The Obama administration very much wants a diplomatic success somewhere in the world. So when the president orders the head of the U.S. Navy to meet with his Chinese counterpart and find areas of cooperation, it is neither surprising nor inappropriate. But the possibility that the Chinese Navy will gain real insight into how our aircraft carriers operate is worrying our Pacific allies and could compromise our security.

Ahoy! The Chinese Navy...
AP

The order to sit down with China’s Admiral Wu Shengli came from the president through Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel to the chief of naval operations, Admiral Jonathan Greenert, last year. It followed Obama’s meeting with Chinese president Xi at Sunnylands in June 2013. Greenert then met with Admiral Wu in September 2013—the first of four meetings—and they identified eight areas of possible cooperation.

The first was an unprecedented invitation to China to participate in the 2014 Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) exercises, the biennial naval maneuvers that are the world’s largest. This year RIMPAC involved 22 nations, 49 surface ships, and 6 submarines. China sent four warships to the maneuvers, which took place in June and July off Hawaii. But in an unexplained display of—something—China also sent an electronic intelligence ship to spy on the exercises.

The second area was a Chinese request to send their “experts” aboard an American aircraft carrier to learn about “maintenance and tactics.” Greenert’s response was “We’re not ready for that.” Yet he left the door open: “We have to manage our way through this.”



More by Steve Cohen

Sharing carrier secrets is a bad idea, one that’s coming not from naval officers, but from their civilian overseers. Joint exercises and military exchange programs are widely believed to reduce the chances of armed misunderstandings. Personal relationships, familiarization with another navy’s ways of doing things, and protocols for CUES—codes for unplanned encounters at sea—reduce the risk of unintended consequences. And those have been the principal focus of the admirals’ discussions.

But the desire to secure some fleeting positive headlines—and perhaps some sincere goodwill—in an ever-more contentious world should not trump long-term security interests. In the words of Admiral James Stavridis, a former supreme allied commander at NATO, “While we want to have the most positive military-to-military relationships possible, such activities have to take into account the need to protect our most sensitive equipment, tactics, and procedures. Nations must have common sense as well as good intentions.”

An aircraft carrier allows a nation to project power far beyond the range of land-based planes and forces. Helping China to extend its military reach is not something the United States should be encouraging or enabling. A new poll from the Pew Research Center found that a majority of citizens in 11 Asian nations are “concerned that territorial disputes between China and its neighbors will lead to a military conflict.”


(93%)Ninety-three percent of Filipinos surveyed feared the possibility of conflict with China. Similarly, fully 85 percent of Japanese and 84 percent of Vietnamese fear armed conflict with China. China’s recent two-month-long stationing of an oil rig off Vietnam and Beijing’s provocative moves over the Senkaku Islands give these allies legitimate reasons for concern.

The distance between Shanghai and contested areas in the South China Sea is more than 1,100 miles. With the introduction of a Chinese aircraft carrier into the region, that distance becomes less of an impediment to an assertive China. As retired Vice Admiral William Douglas Crowder, the former commander of the Seventh Fleet in the Pacific, notes, “If our friends in Asia become convinced that the United States lacks the ability or political will to stand up to PRC intimidation over territorial disputes, they will be forced, however reluctantly, to make their best deal with the PRC. And it won’t likely be a very good deal for them.”

Which brings us back to Admiral Wu’s request for greater insight into American carrier expertise. Since 1985, the Chinese have purchased three Soviet-era carriers along with an Australian ship of World War II design. One, now called the Liaoning, was bought from Ukraine. About 60 percent of the 999-foot ship was replaced with new Chinese electronics and mechanicals, and it was commissioned in 2012.

The Chinese then assigned stealthy, supersonic J-15 Flying Sharks to the air wing. The J-15 was introduced in 2009, and is considered by many to be somewhat more advanced than our own carrier-based F/A-18E/F Super Hornets, though somewhat less capable than the problem-prone F-35s designed to replace our aging attack-fighters.

For the last two years Chinese pilots have been practicing carrier-based operations—mainly launches, arrested landings, and safety drills. To watch videos of these drills is to recognize how the Chinese have borrowed from the American instruction manual. As retired Vice Admiral Peter Daly, the CEO of the United States Naval Institute, points out, the Chinese have already copied, in detail, safety techniques to reduce damage to aircraft from small debris left on the deck by hard landings, along with visual communications to control takeoffs.

The Chinese now want to learn exactly what parts wear out, how often, and what parts of the planes, arresting gear, and catapult systems need maintenance between flights. “Even allowing them to see the level of automation or redundancy in certain systems would go a long way to speeding up their learning curve,” says another retired admiral.

Some military-to-military cooperation—even with a nation such as China—makes sense. As an aide to Admiral Greenert pointed out, “Our goal is not to make them smarter or more capable. It is to learn how to conduct business more safely. We will be operating with them after the next tsunami. So humanitarian relief, search-and-rescue, counterpiracy—these are the things we need to train for together.”

While the Obama administration is understandably anxious to improve relations with the Chinese, at least some members of Congress are urging a go-slow-and-go-smart approach. Rep. Randy Forbes, the chairman of the House Armed Services Subcommittee on Seapower and Projection Forces, said, “While military-to-military exchanges can play an important role in building trust at the operational level, we must be mindful that they are unlikely to alter China’s strategic goals and objectives.”


http://www.weeklystandard.com/articles/getting-know-chinese-navy_804848.html
avatar
Takeda
Coronel
Coronel

Mensajes : 7044

Re: Posturas, apuestas y errores políticos internacionales - escenarios, reuniones y acuerdos

Mensaje por Takeda el 15/10/2014, 7:38 am

Bajo la Lupa

Cómo manejar a China según el general Wesley Clark, ex comandante de la OTAN


Alfredo Jalife-Rahme

El general retirado Wesley Clark, que brilló en la fase clintoniana y su guerra en los Balcanes, acudió al Consejo del Atlántico –muy generoso en obsequiar preseas insustentables a su aliados del Tercer Mundo– a delinear una estrategia para el crecimiento de Estados Unidos y su liderazgo global, basado en su libro No esperar a la siguiente (sic) guerra.

El portal del Consejo del Atlántico elogia al anterior comandante supremo de la OTAN como pensador estratégico excepcional cuando Estados Unidos se desinfla de una década de guerra y se encuentra una vez más de nuevo (sic) en el precipicio (sic) de un nuevo conflicto prolongado (sic).

El general Wesley Clark, autor del libro Ganar las guerras modernas y librar las guerras modernas, se hizo famoso por haber estado a punto de desatar la tercera guerra mundial en Kosovo contra Rusia y por su premonitorio vaticinio sobre los siete estados fallidos, coincidentemente islámicos.

Aborda en su ensayo Cómo manejar (sic) a China cuando su severa supresión de la disensión política desde Hong Kong a Xinjiang, y sus íntimos lazos con Rusia, Irán y Norcorea, han finalmente puesto en reposo el sueño de varios líderes occidentales desde la década de los 90.

Juzga que lo contrario ocurrió: China es más confidente, segura y cerrada y 35 años después de que Deng Xiaoping liberó la economía, el Partido Comunista usa la prosperidad materialista y la ideología nacionalista para mantener su legitimidad frente a las tensiones sociales apremiantes.

Aduce que la política exterior de China se basa en un egoísmo calculado, a expensas de las instituciones internacionales, parámetros y obligaciones que Estados Unidos ha buscado encabezar. Peor aún: China ve a Estados Unidos como un rival y adversario potencial.

Hasta aquí Wesley Clark carece de autocrítica y resalta su desprecio a Rusia para la edificación del nuevo orden mundial. ¿Acabar con Rusia antes, para luego guerrear con China?

Expone su diagnóstico cronológico desde la década de los 70 hasta 2013.

En la década de los 70, Pekín buscó una asociación estratégica con Washington para disuadir la percibida amenaza soviética.

Al final de los 80 los chinos estaban especialmente impresionados con la proeza de Estados Unidos en la guerra del golfo Pérsico de 1991, mientras China construyó su fuerza tecnológica, industrial y agrícola colocando en segundo término su modernización militar.

A finales de 2005, la admiración (sic) de China por Estados Unidos fue tal que un joven y bien conectado líder del PC le comentó: China desea ser el mejor amigo de Estados Unidos para que nos den el liderazgo del mundo, como lo hizo Gran Bretaña con Estados Unidos. ¡Qué ingenuidad!

El punto de inflexión se gestó con la crisis financiera de 2008: aunque todavía respetuosa del poder militar de Estados Unidos, China empezó a ver a (ese país) como un sistema fallido, con una economía endeudada y un gobierno disfuncional, vulnerable para ser sustituido como el líder mundial. ¿A poco no es cierto?

Devela que en 2011, un muy bien ubicado socio (sic) chino le comentó que China intentaba dominar el Mar del Sur de China y que los rivales regionales como Vietnam se inclinarían a sus ambiciones o les aplicarían una lección (sic) y que si Estados Unidos interfería, los activos (nota: financieros) se volverían un objetivo de represalias.

Las amenazas del socio chino se tornaron más ominosas en 2013: podemos detectar su fuerza aérea furtiva; tenemos nuestro propio GPS y podemos derribar los de ustedes; conocemos todas las tecnologías de sus empresas y la NASA.

Un dato relevante: en 2019 China tendrá cuatro portaviones desplegados, lo cual, a mi juicio, representaría un notable posicionamiento frente a los 10 portaviones activos de Estados Unidos.

¡Se desprende que 2019 será un año crucial en los mares!

Luego del garrote vienen las zanahorias y, a mi juicio, Wesley Clark intenta seducir a China (sin Rusia) a un sutil G-2 (el esquema Brzezinski): China no busca el conflicto y puede conseguir la mayoría (sic) de sus objetivos en forma diestra combinando su diplomacia tradicional con su extenso poder económico, pero tampoco evitará el conflicto cuando en el pasado ha usado a su ejército en forma preventiva más que defensiva. Subsiste el riesgo que una China ascendente busque el reconocimiento de su poder y derechosy desencadene un conflicto en forma deliberada o por error de cálculo.

Para Estados Unidos, el profundo problema estratégico es el desafío mas fundamental (sic) de China a la arquitectura global del comercio, las leyes (sic) y la resolución pacífica (sic) de las disputas. Virtudes que, por cierto, no aplica Estados Unidos.

Imbuido por el excepcionalismo de Estados Unidos, se inquieta de que China buscará estructuras y relaciones que sustenten el reinado doméstico del PC y su política de que los países no deben intervenir en los asuntos ajenos. ¿Pretende Estados Unidos excluir la autodeterminación del resto del planeta para imponer su insustentable solipsismo geopolítico?

Wesley Clark intenta incorporar a China al caduco orden mundial unipolar de Estados Unidos antes de que se deslice a ideas nacionalistas del siglo XIX sobre el equilibrio de poder y las esferas de influencia.

Admite que en escala, el ascenso de China rebasa al de Alemania de hace un siglo y al de Japón en los 80, cuando China no es como la Unión Soviética (sic), aislada económicamente de la mayor parte del mundo. ¿No habrá querido decir Rusia?

Alega que durante dos décadas, la estrategia de Estados Unidos con China ha oscilado entre la concesión y la contención, a la que tiende la política del pivote de Obama en Asia mediante la polémica Asociación Transpacífica de 11 países sin China.

Concluye con las advertencias consabidas: los chinos deben entender que la expansión de sus capacidades militares tiene consecuencias (supersic).

Mientras China observa cercanamente los sucesos en Ucrania, Wesley Clark se torna condescendiente: debemos ayudar (sic) a que China entienda (sic) que un alineamiento más cercano y seguro con Rusia solo provocará (sic) a Estados Unidos y a sus aliados.

Viene la propuesta del G-2 subrepticio bajo el dominio hegemónico de Estados Unidos: asumir la responsabilidad compartida (sic) para el liderazgo global, en proporción a su riqueza y poder, perfeccionando las instituciones de gobernación global (ONU, FMI, BM).

De otra forma, China se encontrará aislada y a la defensiva, sin importar lo grande de su economía y su poder militar. ¡Uf!

Se desprende que Estados Unidos ha trazado una línea roja: la intangibilidad de los disfuncionales organismos internacionales que domina.

Desecha que el punto de vista cada vez más prevaleciente en China, de que sustituirá inevitablemente a Estados Unidos como el líder del poder mundial, dista mucho de estar garantizado.

La clave será también que Estados Unidos consiga su independencia energética y retenga el liderazgo global.

Wesley Clark se quedó estancado en el Kosovo de 1998 y es él quien no entiende que 16 años más tarde el mundo post Crimea cambió dramáticamente hacia el incipiente nuevo orden multipolar con el ascenso del BRICS, al unísono de China.

alfredojalife.com

Twitter: @AlfredoJalifeR_

Facebook: AlfredoJalife

Vk: id254048037

Enlace: http://www.jornada.unam.mx/2014/10/15/opinion/024o1pol
avatar
Rogersukoi27
General de División
General de División

Mensajes : 10203
Masculino
Edad : 59

Re: Posturas, apuestas y errores políticos internacionales - escenarios, reuniones y acuerdos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 6/1/2016, 9:17 pm


Sin incluir en la lista de eventos que tengan efectos de consecuencia Geopolitica
en el 2016 (el arribo de la primera flota armada aerea de China a la Isla Spratley,
y la verdadera prueba de Bomba de Hidrogeno por Corea del Norte), sin duda tendran
una agenda muy movida este año en esa zona, y los resultados de dichos proyectos,
sin duda presentaran alternativas que no dejen inmovil los escenarios que se conocen
a la fecha.

Los modelos para crear escenarios de riesgos diversos antes que ocurran, deberan estar muy pendientes para medir y ajustar las variables que se adhieran o se alteren segun el
resultados de estos eventos. No debera olvidarse que en los E.U. tendran proximamente
elecciones internas, y sus divisiones podran demorar las decisiones claves para sostener
el mejor equilibrio que no se respalda solo
!!!! bounce pirat



7 Events of Geopolitical Consequence to Anticipate in Asia in Early 2016

2016 will kick off with a bang. Here’s what you need to keep an eye on early in the new year.

By Ankit Panda
December 31, 2015


2016 is just around the corner and there’s a lot to keep an eye on in Asia in the first month of the year. In January 2016, we’ll see elections in Taiwan, the formal operational launch of China’s Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank, the possible resumption of peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban, the first steps toward renewed comprehensive talks between India and China, and the possible disintegration of a recently concluded controversial deal between the Japanese and South Korean governments on comfort women. Here’s your guide to starting off the new year with an eye to some early developments of geopolitical significance in the Asia-Pacific:

Elections in Taiwan: Taiwanese citizens will head to the polls on January 16 to vote in their latest general elections. Preliminary opinion polling suggests that a victory for the Democratic Progressive Party (DPP), led by its presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen, is likely. The ruling Kuomintang party may find its rule at an end in Taiwan. Should Tsai prevail in the elections, Taiwan will see its first female president and possibly some changes to its foreign policy and positioning vis-a-vis the mainland. The Kuomintang government’s most recent term has seen a controversial period of rapprochement with the mainland. Though the DPP and Tsai have said that they will largely avoid rocking the boat with China if they win, Beijing remains wary. In any case, the outcome of Taiwan’s election next month will be worth watching early in 2016.

The Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank goes live: As I recently discussed in greater detail, the China-led Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) took a major step toward becoming operational last week, when 17 of its founding members ratified the bank’s Articles of Agreement. In January, the inaugural meeting of the bank’s Board of Governors will take place, which will also signal the commencement of the bank’s operations. The AIIB is significant as an example of China’s growing ambitions as a multilateral leader, offering an alternative vision of global governance and development than those of Western-backed institutions such as the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank. In 2016, we’ll see this new institution take off.

A major party congress in Vietnam: In early January, the Vietnamese Communist Party will convene to select a new generation of leadership for the country and the party. Vietnam will elect a new general secretary for the party, a new Politburo, and a new central commission. (See here for background on the domestic dynamics involved.) Vietnam is an increasingly important actor in Southeast Asia and is a claimant in the South China Sea where tensions with China remain high. Hanoi is additionally being courted by the United States and Japan to balance against Beijing’s growing assertiveness in the region. The outcome of the party congress may not necessarily mean major changes to the country’s foreign policy or direction, but this will be an event to watch early in 2016.

An uncomfortable deal between Japan and South Korea: One of the unexpected bits of good news late in 2015 was the announcement of a historic deal between Japan and South Korea on the “comfort women” issue on December 28. The issue has long divided Seoul and Tokyo, two important U.S. allies in Northeast Asia. However, even though the two countries’ foreign ministers declared the issue “resolved finally and irreversibly,” a number of complications have already come up that suggest implementation of this agreement will not be easy. First, the South Korean survivors of sexual slavery at the hands of the Imperial Japanese Army—the “comfort women” themselves—have rejected the deal. Secondly, Tokyo is reportedly linking the disbursement of funds under the agreement to the dismantling of a statue depicting the plight of former “comfort women” near the Japanese embassy in South Korea. This issue appears far from resolved. Expect the first month of 2016 to be heavily dominated by continuing turbulence over the landmark agreement.

Comprehensive peace talks between India and Pakistan: Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s surprise Christmas stopover in Lahore, Pakistan, where he embraced and promenaded with his Pakistani counterpart Nawaz Sharif, sent an unmistakable message that the prospect of comprehensive peace talks between India and Pakistan in 2016 is real and carries momentum. Most of 2015 saw the two nuclear-armed rivals call off planned diplomatic talks, but the final weeks of the year have seen a convergence. Following the display of camaraderie between the two prime ministers, New Delhi and Islamabad are planning foreign secretary-level talks in mid-January to get the ball rolling toward a serious resumption of comprehensive peace talks. The outcome of those talks could set the tone for engagement between the two South Asian giants in 2016.

Peace talks with the Taliban: Afghanistan and Pakistan have seen a cautious rapprochement in the final weeks of 2015 as well. With Islamabad’s imprimatur, peace talks between the Afghan government and the Taliban could be back on early in 2016. The success or failure of those talks will be indicative of just what to expect in Afghanistan’s ongoing struggle against the militants, who have seized more territory than at any time since the U.S. invasion back in 2001.

Birth of the ASEAN Community. This one’s really an honorable mention of sorts, since there isn’t quite an “event” to anticipate, but ASEAN will usher the new year in by formally launching the ASEAN Community, which comprises the ASEAN Economic Community, the ASEAN Political-Security Community, and the ASEAN Socio-Cultural Community. In sum, these initiatives strive to bring more interconnectivity, prosperity, trade, and stability to the ten member states of ASEAN and their 600 million residents. If the ASEAN Community experiment sees early successes, 2016 may be the year we see the emergence of a unified southeast Asian economic bloc—a development that should surely transform how observers think about the economic landscape of the Asia-Pacific.


http://thediplomat.com/2015/12/7-events-of-geopolitical-consequence-to-anticipate-in-asia-in-early-2016/
avatar
Takeda
Coronel
Coronel

Mensajes : 7044

Re: Posturas, apuestas y errores políticos internacionales - escenarios, reuniones y acuerdos

Mensaje por Takeda el 11/6/2017, 12:22 pm

Bajo la lupa


¿Cuál es la profundidad de la alianza estratégica de Rusia y China?


Alfredo Jalife-Rahme

Los multimedia de Rusia y China suelen abundar sobre la alianza estratégica de Moscú y Pekín, que suena a metáfora, ya que se ignora el grado de su profundidad, que puede ser de carácter secreto.

La exitosa primera cumbre de la Nueva Ruta de la Seda en Pekín (B&R) refrendó la intimidad que han tejido el mandarín Xi y el zar Vlady Putin (https://goo.gl/3yyFH7).

Ya antes de la trascendental cumbre B&R de 29 mandatarios en Pekín (https://goo.gl/7icacL), Lyle J. Goldstein, profesor asociado en el Instituto de Estudios Marítimos de China en la Escuela de Guerra Naval de EU, explayó en The National In­terest que el “escenario que debe preocupar a los planificadores de defensa de EU por encima de otros (https://goo.gl/2hWHTb)” es la sombría, aunque todavía raramente discutida posibilidad de que China y Rusia pudieran de cierta manera estar comprometidos en un conflicto armado simultáneo con EU.

Han sido los dos axiomas geoestratégicos sustentados por Bajo la Lupa de que el máximo error de Obama fue haber arrojado a Rusia a los brazos de China y/o viceversa (https://goo.gl/7R36H6) y que uno de los objetivos de Trump consiste en resquebrajar la alianza estratégica de Moscú y Pekín, de la cual se ignora su verdadera profundidad (https://goo.gl/zMZ6Kz).

Goldstein aduce que ni Moscú ni China son suficientemente fuertes (sic) por ellos mismos para competir con Washington en una guerra de alta (sic) intensidad y de larga (sic) duración pero que un buen esfuerzo coordinado en conjunto pudiera sin duda causar mayores problemas a la superpotencia estadunidense a el largo plazo.

Goldstein comenta que en el nuevo mundo Moscú y Pekín se acercan cada vez más como sucedió con su convergencia geoestratégica: desde la participación de la magna delegación china de 70 personas a la reciente conferencia sobre el Ártico patrocinada por Rusia, pasando por el apoyo vocal (sic) de China a la intervención rusa en Siria, hasta la oposición de ambos al despliegue misilístico balístico de EU en Sudcorea (Thaad, por sus siglas en inglés).

Cita un artículo de un think tank chino, Hacer una Alianza con China: los Intereses Nacionales de Rusia y la Probabilidad de una Alianza de China y Rusia, lo cual constituiría una estrategia transformativa.

Cita a significativos estrategas chinos, como Zhang Wenmu, quienes pregonan que la contención de EU invita a una contracontención de China y Rusia cuando su alianza puede representar un instrumento efectivo para lidiar con la presión de EU, donde la base de los inmensos recursos naturales de Rusia es considerada por China.

Zhang Wenmu, considerado el primer “estratega marítimo ( navalist)” de China, dejó su marca en la estrategia con la construcción de un portaviones.

En su libro de 2009 Sobre el poder naval de China, Zhang aduce que su poder comercial global le obliga a detentar una poderosa armada, al estilo del estadunidense Alfred Thayer Mahan (https://goo.gl/my9AyL).

En 2014, Zhang publicó un ensayo de mucho impacto – El significado de los eventos de Ucrania para el mundo y su advertencia a China– cuando Rusia obtuvo una mayor victoria frente a Occidente debido a la maestría de Putin como gran estratega.

A juicio de Zhang, el triunfo de Rusia se debió a que Crimea es un asunto de vida o muerte, mientras que para Europa es uno más de sus varios temas importantes: por Crimea, Rusia colocaría todos sus recursos, mientras Occidente no lo haría. Juzga que la base del éxito de Putin yace en que frenó la expansión de la OTAN al Oriente.

Para Zhang el ex presidente George W. Bush o la ex secretaria de Estado Hillary Clinton sólo conocen una retórica hueca y carecen de sentido estratégico.

El pivote de Asia de EU para contener a China representa un ensayo de regresar al EU de 1950 para crear un anillo que cerque a China, por lo que la crisis de Ucrania proveyó un momento de claridad en la política mundial, donde Rusia con resolución usó su mayor recurso: su poder militar y no su softpower, por lo que China debe adoptar la misma resolución que Rusia ante EU.

La diplomacia china debe ser más muscular, ya que el comercio se encuentra profundamente impactado por la política en todos lados, por lo que China requiere ahora de un espacio de seguridad, sin el cual no podía estar seguro, y que protegería su cinturón dorado a lo largo de su costa oriental, donde Taiwán es el principal cuello de botella que impide el pleno desarrollo del poder marítimo chino, como Putin fue capaz de extender su zona de seguridad durante la crisis de Ucrania hasta el sur de Crimea cuando la OTAN no tuvo otro recurso porque Crimea se encontraba lejos del alcance de su poder.

Para el geoestratega marítimo Zhang, “el mayor error en la política exterior de EU en el nuevo siglo ha sido empujar a China en la dirección de Rusia (https://goo.gl/yrNnb4)”. ¡La misma tesis de Bajo la Lupa!

A juicio de Zhang la primera prioridad de Rusia es mejorar su economía, lo cual depende de la mejoría de sus relaciones con Europa y EU. Y predice que, debido a la fuerte presión de EU y sus aliados, China necesita un país con el que pueda tener una cooperación cercana que forme un flanco estratégico en la retaguardia que es Rusia y que será el objetivo más fundamental para la conformación de una alianza de China, que no necesariamente tiene que ser formalizada.

¿Existirá un pacto secreto entre Xi y Putin para confrontar la caduca hegemonía unipolar de EU?

Un punto clave radica en la percepción de Zhang, quien concluye que la asfixia estrategia de EU y su contención no han todavía alcanzado un nivel que sea imperativo para que China y Rusia estén listos a formar una alianza formal.

El aumento del transporte de petróleo y gas de Rusia mejorará la seguridad energética de China cuando destaca la coordinación de China y Rusia en asuntos diplomáticos delicados, como los temas de Irán y Norcorea, según Zhang, quien vaticina que el poder ascendente de Rusia le permitirá aumentar su posición dentro de una alianza, por lo que de aquí a 10 años, el potencial de una alianza de China y Rusia aumentará.

Reconoce que Rusia difícilmente requiere la ayuda de las fuerzas militares chinas, mientras que la conversión del poder económico de China en uno militar constituye un proceso lento relativamente que resulta en un retraso, cuando su ascendencia económica es más obvia.

Lyle J. Goldstein interpreta que Zhang implica que la persistente debilidad militar de China es un obstáculo (sic) para su alianza con Rusia, quizá debido a que China no se ha visto como un socio suficientemente capaz.

Russia Insider invita a la lectura del especialista Goldstein sobre la factibilidad de una alianza de China y Rusia y enfatiza cómo el pensamiento chino es sorprendentemente similar a la postura de Rusia.

Por ahora los chinos sienten que no existe necesidad ahora para una imbricada alianza formal, salvo que China y Rusia sufran mayor presión de EU (https://goo.gl/dZ9gOr).

¿Existirá una alianza estratégica secreta de Rusia y China para frenar el irredentismo de EU?

www.alfredojalife.com

Twitter: @AlfredoJalifeR_

Facebook: AlfredoJalife

Vk: id254048037


ENLACE: http://www.jornada.unam.mx/2017/06/11/opinion/012o1pol
avatar
Rogersukoi27
General de División
General de División

Mensajes : 10203
Masculino
Edad : 59

Re: Posturas, apuestas y errores políticos internacionales - escenarios, reuniones y acuerdos

Mensaje por Rogersukoi27 el 11/6/2017, 1:11 pm

Takeda escribió:
Bajo la lupa


¿Cuál es la profundidad de la alianza estratégica de Rusia y China?


Alfredo Jalife-Rahme








Para el geoestratega marítimo Zhang, “el mayor error en la política exterior de EU en el nuevo siglo ha sido empujar a China en la dirección de Rusia (https://goo.gl/yrNnb4)”. ¡La misma tesis de Bajo la Lupa!


Reconoce que Rusia difícilmente requiere la ayuda de las fuerzas militares chinas, mientras que la conversión del poder económico de China en uno militar constituye un proceso lento relativamente que resulta en un retraso, cuando su ascendencia económica es más obvia.

Lyle J. Goldstein interpreta que Zhang implica que la persistente debilidad militar de China es un obstáculo (sic) para su alianza con Rusia, quizá debido a que China no se ha visto como un socio suficientemente capaz.



Vk: id254048037


ENLACE: http://www.jornada.unam.mx/2017/06/11/opinion/012o1pol

Me parece muy conservador el analisis que el proceso militar Chino es UN PROCESO LENTO,
que ocasiona una persistente debilidad militar de China.
Quizas las ventajas de Rusia sobre China, han sobresalido por varias decadas, mas los avances
propios (con copy/paste) de los diseños Rusos, muestran ventajas en algunos rubros que
los mismos Gringos.
Por continuidad en sus proyectos militares, no queda duda, que tan avanzados han llegado,
quizas con algunos años por cumplirse, se tendra un mejor equilibrio para una alianza mutua
con los Rusos.
avatar
Takeda
Coronel
Coronel

Mensajes : 7044

Re: Posturas, apuestas y errores políticos internacionales - escenarios, reuniones y acuerdos

Mensaje por Takeda el 11/6/2017, 2:12 pm

El problema es que la consolidación de su poder naval no está a menos de 10 años de materializarse, quizá eso es lo que supone como fortalecimiento naval lento. A estas alturas no suena descabellado que China se sume al proyecto Shtorm ruso, en la práctica tendrían flotas de portaaviones homologadas, con portaaviones ligeros del tipo Kuznetsov y portaaviones nucleares del tipo Shtorm.

Contenido patrocinado

Re: Posturas, apuestas y errores políticos internacionales - escenarios, reuniones y acuerdos

Mensaje por Contenido patrocinado

  • Publicar nuevo tema
  • Responder al tema

Fecha y hora actual: 18/12/2017, 10:40 am